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racial inequality

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A white Minneapolis police officer’s killing of George Floyd on May 25 sparked protests across the country and world, as well as conversations about how different sectors of American society uphold racial discrimination and inequity. This summer, Stateside is conducting a series of conversations on what systemic racism looks like. This week we hear from scholars on how systemic racism blocks Black Americans from opportunities to accumulate wealth.

a black boy sits writing in a notebook at a table
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After a white police officer killed George Floyd in Minneapolis, protests erupted across the country against police brutality toward Black people in America. In the intervening weeks, a national dialogue has erupted over the many ways American istitutions prop up and proliferate racism against Black people.

This summer, Stateside is conducting a series of conversations on what systemic racism looks like. This week we hear from educators, parents and journalists regarding how systemic racism affects Black children and reinforces white America’s biases against against them.

a young black boy reading a workbook
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Protests continue across the country in response to police brutality against Black Americans. But while systemic racism might be most visible in the criminal justice system, it touches every aspect of American society. That includes our education system. 

Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

Activists took to the streets of Eight Mile Road again Wednesday evening to draw attention to the Detroit area’s racial divisions. Eight Mile has long served as a dividing line between predominantly-Black Detroit, and its predominantly-white suburbs.

Organizers say that Black people often fear crossing Eight Mile because it can lead to negative encounters with police. And they say suburban residents often fear crossing Eight Mile because they associate Detroit with violence.

Picture of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
WMU Archives

Monday is Martin Luther King Jr. Day, but Tuesday, communities across the state and country will celebrate the W.K. Kellogg Foundation’s Fourth National Day of Racial Healing.

La June Montgomery Tabron, president and CEO of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, says all the events are modeled after Martin Luther King Jr.’s vision of racial harmony.

Topographic map of the counties of Ingham & Livingston, Michigan
Library of Congress

 

Lynching is one of this country's darkest legacies. It claimed the lives of thousands of black Americans, particularly in the South. But the South wasn't the only place where mobs of white people brutally murdered black citizens. In the wake of the Civil War, Michigan saw three lynchings of African-American men by white mobs.

Detroit Alumni chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi / via Facebook

Members of a national fraternity have plans for today’s Detroit Lions-Minnesota Vikings game at Ford Field, where they’ll stage a protest to support their fellow fraternity brother, NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick.

This is the second time the Detroit alumni chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi will gather to show support for Kaepernick outside a Lions game. The group held a similar protest in September.

Courtesy: St. Louis Public Radio

Racial tensions between white people and people of color are reaching levels not seen since the 1960s and ‘70s.

woman at podium
Cheyna Roth / Michigan Radio

The Michigan League for Public Policy aimed to have what it called an “honest discussion” about racial inequality in Michigan at its annual forum Monday. 

From the Flint water crisis to the state of Detroit Public Schools, the League wanted Michiganders to take a hard look at how racial inequality impacts their communities and learn about ways to make change.