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Robert Scott

The Flint water treatment plant
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Some of the state workers indicted as part of the Flint water crisis investigation may soon return to work.

Last week, state prosecutors dismissed charges against eight current and former government officials as they begin to reassess the investigation.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A preliminary hearing for two of the lesser-known defendants in the Flint water crisis investigation is set to begin this week.

Nancy Peeler and Robert Scott were indicted nearly two years ago.

The 2 state health officials who allegedly suppressed data about blood lead levels in Flint children are scheduled to be in court Wednesday.

Prosecutors allege, in July of 2015, Nancy Peeler requested an internal report on blood lead level data in Flint children.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A Wayne State University professor testified today that state officials didn’t want information getting out about continuing problems with Flint’s drinking water.

In 2016, Dr. Shawn McElmurry led a research team, hired by the state, to investigate a deadly Legionnaires' disease outbreak that occurred in Genesee County in 2014 and 2015.  At least a dozen people died from the pneumonia-like illness. Scores more were hospitalized.   

Flint Mayor Karen Weaver
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Six state workers accused of criminal wrongdoing in the Flint Water Crisis are getting their state paychecks once again - and Flint’s mayor is not happy that.

The six suspended state workers are charged with a total of 18 felony charges. They were initially suspended without pay, but their pay was reinstated this week.

Flint Mayor Karen Weaver doesn’t think the six should be getting a state paycheck.

“It makes you question what people’s priorities are,” Weaver told reporters today.  

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A judge has agreed to consolidate the criminal cases against eight defendants related to the Flint water crisis.

Genesee District Judge Tracy Collier-Nix agreed to consolidate the criminal cases.  The cases involve current and former employees with the departments of Environmental Quality and Health and Human Services. The ruling only applies through the preliminary exam phase.

A spokeswoman with the Michigan Attorney General’s office calls the move “procedural”.  AG office spokeswoman Andrea Bitely says, ”All cases were consolidated for judicial economy.”