sexually transmitted disease | Michigan Radio
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sexually transmitted disease

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

State health officials are urging Michiganders to be tested for several sexually transmitted diseases.

Until recently, Michigan has seen a slow decline in chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis cases. But a new report shows cases of all three STDs spiked last year. Chlamydia cases are up 8%. Gonorrhea jumped 20%.  Syphilis rose 28%.

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services says a majority of the increases occurred among adolescents, African-American men and women, and men who have sex with other men.

Mark Tuschman/ITI, originally published in Community Eye Health Journal / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/

Rates of sexually transmitted diseases are on the rise, but many doctors aren't aware of one of the most effective tools for fighting these infections. When a patient comes in for treatment of gonorrhea or chlamydia, their doctor can prescribe antibiotics for their partner at the same time, sight unseen. It’s called expedited partner therapy, or EPT.

MDHHS
Michigan Department of Health and Human Services

According the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS), the number of reported cases of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in the state increased from 2016 to 2017.

A statement released Wednesday said there was a 9 percent rise in Chlamydia cases, a 22 percent increase in gonorrhea, and a 28 percent increase in primary and secondary syphilis. MDHHS says these statistics reflect a national trend toward rising reports of STDs.

According to MDHHS, all sexually active individuals should be seek prompt treatment if they test positive for an STD.

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The number of people diagnosed with chlamydia rose 6.4% in Michigan from 2014 to 2015.  In all, there were 47,702 cases of chlamydia last year.

Gonorrhea cases rose 9.8%, with 10,615 people being infected.

But the increase probably doesn't mean that more people are catching STDs, says Katie McComber with the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services.