summer camp | Michigan Radio
WUOMFM

summer camp

The Leslie Science & Nature Center holds many summer camps and adventure programs.
Flickr // Leslie Science & Nature Center

New results of soil testing done at the Leslie Science and Nature Center in Ann Arbor show elevated levels of arsenic, lead, and copper, among other heavy metals and semi and volatile organic compounds.

The center conducted testing back in May, and the results were released on June 20. 

 

Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

For many kids, summer camp is a rite of passage. It’s the first time away from family for an extended period of time. There are new activities to explore like horseback riding and archery.

But for kids with autism spectrum disorders or other developmental disabilities, summer camp isn’t always an option.

Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

Stateside returns with another campfire story told by Jenifer Strauss, a professional storyteller based in Traverse City.

Jen spent her summers attending Tamarack Camps, a Jewish summer camp run by the Fresh Air Society in Bloomfield Hills. It was during these adolescent years when she first heard the urban legend, “Bloody Mary.”

Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

Each year, Native American kids can enjoy a cultural summer camp experience at the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi's Rodgers Lake campus. Many of the camp activities are built around cultural teachings, and a big part of that is telling stories passed down through generations. 

Colin Wesaw is a tribal elder and leader in the Pokagon Band community. He often tells stories at Camp Kë Gbéshmen in Dowagiac. The 63-year-old started telling stories when he was just 18. 

He joined Stateside to talk about the importance of stories, and to share a tale about making choices. 

EMMA WINOWIECKI / MICHIGAN RADIO

There are some classic campfire stories we hear again and again, like Bloody Mary or the hitchhiker. Then there are stories unique to the place they are told.

Stories where the long-last camper or escaped madman is roaming around your lake, or where the ghost mentioned may be in your cabin.

That’s the kind of story J. Berry, manager for instrument services at the Interlochen Center for the Arts, tells us. 

Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

There's something about the a crackling campfire and the looming mystery of a nighttime forest that creates the perfect atmosphere for telling a special kind of story.

Some campfire stories aim to send a shiver down your spine. Others seek to remember a past moment in history or teach a good life lesson.

With that tradition in mind, Stateside will be bringing you a series of stories this summer perfect for your next bonfire. 

Roasted marshmallows
Brian Sawyer / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

This summer, Flint children will have a chance to escape from the city's crisis with lead-tainted tap water.

Camp Joy will be held in southwest Michigan this summer for children from two areas of Flint considered to be especially hard hit by the water crisis.

It won't cost them a thing.

Reverend Jerri Porter of Dowagiac is one of the camp's organizers. She says transportation, clothing, toiletries and food will be included.

"We don't want any costs incurred to the families. They've suffered enough. This is our gift to them," Porter said.

Craig Titley / Flickr

“Camp Kitigin is a chance for adults to get outside and be a kid again,” says Stephanie Wirtz, outdoor recreation and events coordinator for the Saginaw County Parks and Recreation Commission.  

There is one condition: The camp is screen-free –which means no laptops, smartphones, or any other devices. It’s a chance for adults to get away from the screens and social media sites and reconnect with nature.

Wirtz says documenting  every moment has become a part of our daily lives, and you'll still be able to do so at the camp. You'll just have to do it the old-fashioned way. 

Camp Kitigin will provide you with a journal and disposable camera, so you can still capture those fun moments.

Activities at the camp will include fishing, hiking, kayaking, campfires, zip-lining, and more.

Wirtz said there will be men's and women's cabins; each cabin sleeps 10 campers.

Just like when you were a kid, except no curfews.

“We want to get people outside and we want them to get excited about being outside again,” Wirtz says.

Camp Kitigin will be open August 15-17 and again September 12-14 at YMCA’s Camp Timbers in West Branch. Registration is $200 and all proceeds go to athletic programs throughout Michigan. 

*Listen to full story above.

–Bre'Anna Tinsley, Michigan Radio Newsroom.