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systemic racism

Spartan Stadium
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Today on Stateside, Big Ten football returns this weekend. A sports columnist talks us through what collegiate football games will be like in a pandemic year. Also, a look at what life was like for African American people in Michigan prior to the Civil War. Plus, a Black family wonders whether they’re still welcome in their home in Cadillac.

A young Black child with curly hair writes in a notebook while sitting in the grass
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Today on Stateside, we talk to a Michigan Teacher of the Year about how he creates an inclusive learning environment for LGBTQ students in his classroom. We also talk about how educators can challenge white supremacy and advance racial justice within schools. And we'll hear about a project that aims to tell a more complex, nuanced story of Native American communities in Michigan by hiring Indigenous reporters. 

Judge's gavel
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Today on Stateside, a new report shows Blacks citizens are far more likely to face felony charges in Washtenaw County, one of the state’s most populous and progressive counties. Plus, we talk to the architect of a memorial on Belle Isle to honor the 1,500 people in Detroit who have been killed by COVID-19.

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A white Minneapolis police officer’s killing of George Floyd on May 25 sparked protests across the country and world, as well as conversations about how different sectors of American society uphold racial discrimination and inequity. This summer, Stateside is conducting a series of conversations on what systemic racism looks like. This week we hear from scholars on how systemic racism blocks Black Americans from opportunities to accumulate wealth.

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Today on Stateside, state health officials report that there are currently 14 COVID-19 outbreaks in Southeast Michigan associated with schools, but they won’t say which ones. A reporter talks us through how the health department shares—and retains—information on outbreaks. Also, the story behind the viral video of U.S. Postal Service mail sorter machines being scrapped in Grand Rapids. Plus, a new podcast documents the history of the Ford Bronco.

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Today on Stateside, on Tuesday, Michigan State University announced it was transitioning to remote learning for undergraduates and urged students to stay home. Meanwhile, faculty at the University of Michigan are protesting the university’s decision to continue with in-person classes. Conversations with professors from both universities tell a tale of two schools. Plus, how the pandemic highlights racial inequality in college access.

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Today on Stateside, a familiar voice to Michigan Radio listeners has taken the mic on the national stage. A conversation with Jenn White, host of NPR’s 1A, who will host Stateside tomorrow. Plus, what a breakthrough on the state’s Return to Learn bills will mean for schools preparing to start this fall. And, in a continuation of our summer series on systemic racism, how lack of access to capital and intergenerational wealth affects Black Americans.

back of child's head
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Today on Stateside, the Michigan Senate will meet in a special Saturday session this weekend to make recommendations for school reopenings. We hear from two reporters about what factors lawmakers are considering as they plan for what a return to the classroom could look like this fall. Plus, a Detroit-born journalist discusses how racial profiling and police brutality complicated his relationship with the cars he grew up loving. 

The Detroit Institute of Arts
Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

As the nation grapples with how its institutions treat people of color, the surge in conversations about how systemic racism exists in our social structures isn’t confined to the criminal justice or health systems. It’s also affecting the arts community, including in Detroit, where current and former staff and volunteers at the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit (MOCAD) and the Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA) have formed public campaigns asking for change at these institutions.

Michigan football stadium
Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, Governor Gretchen Whitmer has been vocal about her decision to only reopen schools if public health officials agree it is safe.

What are the discussions happening between the Governor and the Republican led legislature regarding schools and education funding? Plus a conversation with former Detroit Institute of Arts and Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit employees about systemic racism in art institutions. Also, we spoke with the reporter who wrote about University of Michigan football star Jon Vaughn’s story of survival in “an ecosystem of abuse.”

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On May 25, the killing of George Floyd by a Minneapolis police officer set off protests across the country, as well as conversations about how racial discrimination and disenfranchisement are upheld by different sectors of American society. This summer, Stateside is conducting a series of conversations on what systemic racism looks like. This week we hear from a journalist, a landlord, and the director of a community center about how systemic racism affects housing, from property rental to the way neighborhoods are structured.

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Today on Stateside, a conversation about how childcare collectives are being modeled to fill in where our institutions are falling behind. Also, a look at housing inequality through the lens of a landlord. 

Congresswoman Debbie Dingell
U.S. House of Representatives

Today on Stateside, Congresswoman Debbie Dingell discusses the string of arrests of protestors by heavily armed agents in Portland, Oregon, and what it could mean for Michigan. Also, a conversation about how systemic racism reaches easily into the housing sector. Plus, the history behind the integration of Boblo Island ferries and the Rosa Parks-like woman behind it.

James Colby Hook III, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Today on Stateside, a new ruling from the Michigan Supreme Court will have major implications on how counties collect money on tax foreclosed homes. As back to school season comes into view, how are teachers feeling about returning to work in uncertain times. Plus, how Sundown Towns across Michigan defined systemic racism in housing and neighborhoods.

a black boy sits writing in a notebook at a table
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After a white police officer killed George Floyd in Minneapolis, protests erupted across the country against police brutality toward Black people in America. In the intervening weeks, a national dialogue has erupted over the many ways American istitutions prop up and proliferate racism against Black people.

This summer, Stateside is conducting a series of conversations on what systemic racism looks like. This week we hear from educators, parents and journalists regarding how systemic racism affects Black children and reinforces white America’s biases against against them.

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Today on Stateside, developments in the cases surrounding the death of 16-year-old Cornelius Fredericks at a youth facility in Kalamazoo. Also, how systemic racism impacts the mental health of Black Americans. Plus, Michigan is challenging how the U.S Department of Education is allocating coronavirus relief money.

Black woman in therapy sits with her head in her hands as her therapist takes notes on a clipboard
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Black Americans reported a significant spike in symptoms of anxiety and depression following the release of the video that showed a Minneapolis police officer kneeling on George Floyd’s neck for nearly nine minutes. 

“It’s important to understand that the killing of unarmed Black men—and Black people, period—it’s had a collective toll on our psyche,” said Napoleon Harrington, a therapist at Ambassador Counseling and Resource Group.

$100 bills
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Nearly nine in ten of the more than 121,000 Michigan businesses that have received forgivable loans through the Paycheck Protection Program did not answer voluntary questions about race and ethnicity.

An image of a pregnant lady lying in a hospital bed holding her tummy, with a close up on the drip in her hand
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The past few months have focused national attention on systemic racism in American policing. But criminal justice is far from the only sector of American society that is touched by these problems. This summer, Stateside is launching a series of conversations about how racism in systemic, institutional, and everyday forms affects Black Americans. We’re starting with a discussion about health care where, as in policing, racism can be a matter of life or death. 

illustration of nurses and doctors wearing PPE
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Michigan’s COVID-19 caseload has been on a rollercoaster for the past few weeks. We spoke with Michigan's medical director Joneigh Khaldun for an update. Plus, researchers at Michigan State University are working on cultivating the ever elusive morel mushrooms. And, we kick off our summer series about how systemic racism shapes the world around us with a conversation about healthcare.

person holding a "no qualified immunity" sign
Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

Over the past few weeks, the Black Lives Matter protests have kept the issue of police brutality at the top of mind for many Americans. While police conduct may be informed by hundreds of years of systemic racism, it's also guided by a specific federal court cases. So how does change happen within the context of that legal framework? 

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A long-time top Environmental Protection Agency official worries proposed cuts in the federal agency’s budget will hurt cities like Flint.

Mustafa Ali resigned this week as the EPA’s Chief Environmental Justice official.   He helped create the job two decades ago.  Ali  says he’s leaving the agency because of the Trump administration’s plans to cut the EPA’s budget by more than 20%.