temujin kensu | Michigan Radio
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temujin kensu

MDOC

Temujin Kensu has been in prison for nearly 35 years, after being convicted of a murder that took place in Port Huron, even though multiple witnesses placed him in Escanaba in the Upper Peninsula at the time.

Kensu's appeals have all failed, largely on technical grounds.  

The 57 year old Kensu, who changed his name from Fred Freeman after his conversion to Buddism in prison, has battled chronic health conditions for years, including an auto-immune disorder, according to his attorney. 

Michigan Department of Corrections

Attorneys for Fredrick Freeman hope he will soon be a free man, after serving 31 years for a murder they say he did not commit.

David Sanders of Proving Innocence says Freeman was convicted because of the incompetence of his defense attorney, and because of prosecutorial misconduct.

Sanders says there was no physical evidence tying Freeman to the 1986 murder, and he had multiple alibi witnesses, including one who testified she was with him at the exact time of the murder.

Bill Proctor (right) with Walter Swift, who spent 26 years in prison for a crime he didn't commit.
Bill Proctor

Bill Proctor retired after he spent 33 years as a well-known Detroit television reporter.

But rather than focus on his golf game, he's using his skills as an investigative reporter and a former law enforcement officer to help criminal cases where he believes the person has been wrongly convicted.

To accomplish that, he launched the organization Proving Innocence. As he sees it, the organization helps overturn some of the wrongs done by our criminal justice system.   

(Michigan Department of Corrections)

Governor Jennifer Granholm has refused to commute the life sentence of a man who insists he was wrongly convicted of killing another man in Port Huron in 1986. The case involves the Innocence Clinic at the University of Michigan Law School.