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u.s. border

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President Donald Trump continues to threaten to close down the border with Mexico to stop immigrants from reaching the U.S.

Such a move would shut down the U.S. auto industry "within a week," according to Kristin Dziczek of the Center for Automotive Research.

Nearly every model of vehicle assembled in the U.S. utilizes some parts made in Mexico, and millions of vehicles are assembled in Mexico for export to the U.S.

A shutdown would also hurt many other aspects of the economy, including agriculture, says economist Charles Ballard at Michigan State University.

picture of a grocery store
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A map made of toe tags representing undocumented migrants who died in the Sonoran Desert is part of the museum exhibit Hostile Terrian 94, created by University of Michigan anthropologist Jason De León.
Daniel Lopez / Undocumented Migration Project

Today on Stateside, we speak with two Oakland County public health officials about the measles outbreak there, and what residents can do to protect themselves and their children. Plus, a look at proposed reforms to Michigan's guardianship system for elderly and incapacitated adults. 

Rachel and Adam / Bethany Christian Services

 


Young children separated from their families at the border cannot be held in immigration detention centers for more than three days. After 72 hours, the Office of Refugee Resettlement looks to find a shelter or foster care home for the child.  

 

Fritzmb / Flickr

U.S. Representative Candice Miller (R-Harrison Township) is expected to introduce a bill today that would order the Department of Homeland Security to create a plan to secure 100 percent of the U.S. borders with Mexico and Canada, the Detroit News reports. From the News:

A draft copy of the bill, the Secure Border Act of 2011, was obtained Wednesday by The Detroit News. It would require DHS Secretary Janet Napolitano and her agency, within 180 days of its passage, to identify how to bring the northern and southern borders under full "operational control" — meaning authorities have clear ways of patrolling and controlling passage over a border — within five years.

Achieving full operational control of the borders would likely cost hundreds of millions of dollars or more, if current projections are any indication.

Among the potential solutions are increased levels of fencing and boosted patrols on the southern border, while the U.S.-Canada border would be a prime candidate for a beefed-up Coast Guard presence in the Great Lakes, watch towers like those deployed along the St. Clair River and unmanned aerial drones in use in states like Arizona.

Both borders are far below that 100 percent goal. Forty-four percent of the U.S.-Mexican border is estimated to be under operational control; the U.S.-Canadian border is less than 2 percent controlled.

Rep. Miller chairs the Subcommittee on Maritime and Border Security in the U.S. House of Representatives.