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U.S. Supreme Court

Updated at 10:40 p.m. ET

The Trump administration can end counting for the 2020 census early after the Supreme Court approved a request to suspend a lower court order that extended the count's schedule.

United States Supreme Court building with people standing in front of it.
Liam James Doyle/NPR

The Senate Judiciary Committee is holding hearings on President Trump's Supreme Court nominee, Judge Amy Coney Barrett. Barrett would fill the seat left vacant with the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Watch the hearings live.

Amy Coney Barrett acknowledged on Tuesday that accepting President Trump's nomination to the Supreme Court has brought public attention, scrutiny and criticism — but she also feels a strong call to serve the public.

Senate Judiciary Committee chairman Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., asked Barrett on the second day of her confirmation hearings how she felt about being in the position in which she now finds herself.

Updated at 11:01 a.m. ET

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is lying in repose at the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday and Thursday, a two-day event honoring a justice who was both a cultural and legal icon.

As Ginsburg's casket arrived at the high court, former law clerks lined the Supreme Court steps. Supreme Court police officers served as pallbearers. Then the justice's family, close friends and members of the court held a brief ceremony in the court's Great Hall.

Back of a school bus
Pixabay

Today on Stateside, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death last week sent shockwaves throughout the nation, both emotionally and politically. We talk to one of her former clerks about Ginsburg's legacy and what the future makeup of the Supreme Court means for Michigan. Plus, a former Michigan football player talks about the abuse scandal surrounding former sports doctor Robert Anderson, and the breadth of access our state institutions provide to abusers.

U.S. Supreme Court

Michigan’s two U.S. Senators are calling for a delay in the vote on a new U.S. Supreme Court Justice to replace the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg
Haraz Ghanbari/AP

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the demure firebrand who in her 80s became a legal, cultural, and feminist icon has died. The Supreme Court announced her death, saying the cause was complications from cancer.

Architect of the legal fight for women's rights in the 1970s, Ginsburg subsequently served 27 years on the nation's highest court, becoming its most prominent member. Her death will inevitably set in motion what promises to be a nasty and tumultuous political battle over who will succeed her, and it thrusts the Supreme Court vacancy into the spotlight of the presidential campaign.

The U.S. Supreme Court building
U.S. Supreme Court

Today on Stateside, we talk to a Detroit artist whose new mural is a monument to Malice Green and the wider community of Black citizens killed at the hands of police. Plus, two young Dreamers discuss what the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision on the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program (DACA) means for them.

The U.S. Supreme Court Justices
supremecourt.gov

The United States Supreme Court has dealt a victory to some Flint Michigan residents seeking damages for the city’s contaminated drinking water.

The court’s action last week clears a barrier residents faced trying to sue government officials.

But some Flint residents fear they’re still a long way from getting compensation.

Jeff Smith / Flickr

 


Today on Stateside, the U.S. Supreme Court has struck down a lower court's ruling that ordered Michigan to redraw its congressional and state legislative district lines before the 2020 election. Plus, we talk to the reporter who helped solve the mysterious disappearance of a young Michigan man and FBI informant.

Updated at 12:59 p.m. ET

The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments Tuesday in a long-awaited set of cases testing whether the federal law that bars sex discrimination in employment applies to LGBTQ employees.

Specifically, the question is whether employers are free to fire employees because they are gay or transgender.

Jay Kaplan and Aimee Stephens stand next to each other
Rowan Niemisto / WDET

 


Aimee Stephens took months to compose a letter to her employer in July 2013. It read: 

“With the support of my loving wife, I have decided to become the person that my mind already is. I cannot begin to describe the shame and suffering that I have lived with. At the end of my vacation on August 26, 2013, I will return to work as my true self, Aimee Australia Stephens, in appropriate business attire.” 

These words propelled Stephens into the heart of a legal case soon to be argued before the U.S. Supreme Court ─ a potentially landmark case for the future of LGBTQ rights in this country.

Courtesy of the MI Supreme Court

 

 

Today on Stateside, how two new major US Supreme Court decisions will impact Michigan. Plus, with the anniversary of the Stonewall riots this Friday, we look at the history of the gay rights movement in Michigan.

 

Michigan congressional map
Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons


Live Video: Brett Kavanaugh Opening Statements

Sep 5, 2018

Watch the confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

Live video: Brett Kavanaugh questioning continues

Sep 5, 2018
U.S. Supreme Court
Pixabay

Questioning Continues for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

Gavel
Joe Gratz / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

The American Civil Liberties Union is challenging the state of Michigan over its handling of the state's sex offender registry. 

In 2016, the 6th Circuit Court ruled that aspects of Michigan’s Sex Offender Registry Act, SORA, were unconstitutional.

The court’s opinion specifically noted portions of the act which allowed the state to retroactively impose punishments on individuals without due process. 

The state of Michigan appealed the circuit court's ruling, sending Does vs Snyder to the U.S. Supreme Court. In October 2017, the Supreme Court decided not to take up the case, upholding the 6th Circuit Court's unanimous decision. 

It has now been nearly two years since the original ruling and the Legislature has failed to make any reforms to the law.

At the end of June, the ACLU filed a lawsuit against Michigan to force the state to finally make changes to its sex offender registry. 

U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit

Both of Michigan’s United States senators announced today they will oppose President Trump's choice to fill a vacancy on the U.S. Supreme Court.

The U.S. Supreme Court building
U.S. Supreme Court

Members of Jackson County’s Board of Commissioners will officially be allowed to lead prayers at public meetings. That’s after the Supreme Court denied a request to review the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals’ previous decision, which ruled in favor of the county.  

The plaintiff, Peter Bormuth, is a self-proclaimed Pagan and Animist. He argues that commissioner-led Christian prayers violate the First Amendment.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow (D-MI) says she has concerns about some of the individuals President Trump is considering naming to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Though she declines to say which of the prospective candidates to fill the vacancy on the nation’s highest court concern her.

Trump is promising to select a "great" Supreme Court nominee to fill the vacancy of retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy. He’s expected to name his choice Monday.

Muslims hold a vigil in Royal Oak in response to attacks in Libya.
Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

The U.S. Supreme Court this week upheld President Trump’s ban on travel from seven countries: North Korea, Venezuela, Syria, Iran, Yemen, Libya, and Somalia. Five of these countries are majority-Muslim nations where many Michigan residents have family members.

Now, the Council on American-Islamic Relations - Michigan (CAIR) and the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) are partnering to look at how the upheld travel ban will impact Muslims living in Michigan. 

Joe Ross / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Michigan's police and firefighter unions will no longer be mandatory for employees to join after the United States Supreme Court decided Wednesday that the practice was unconstitutional.

U.S. Supreme Court building
Claire Anderson / Unsplash

The Supreme Court issued a landmark decision Wednesday in the case Janus v. the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, Council 31. AFSCME is the largest public sector union in the country.

In a 5-4 decision, the conservative majority held that public sector workers who are represented by unions cannot be required to pay any union dues.

Protesters against the initial travel ban at Detroit Metro Airport, Jan. 30.
Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

The ACLU of Michigan and the Arab American Civil Rights League will continue to fight President Trump's travel ban, despite a Supreme Court ruling Tuesday morning that the ban is constitutional.

The travel ban, first imposed in January 2017 as the result of an executive order, restricts entry to the United States from several Muslim-majority Arab countries.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Many online shoppers may have to start doing something new: pay sales tax.

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled today states can force online shoppers to pay sales tax.  

The decision came in a case that pitted the state of South Dakota and online shopping giant Wayfair.

The 5-4 ruling Thursday is a win for states, who said they were losing out on billions of dollars annually under two decades-old Supreme Court decisions that impacted online sales tax collection.

The barge in the middle of the Straits of Mackinac.
Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

 


This week, the U.S. Supreme Court released a decision that could strengthen the fishing rights of Native American tribes across the nation. It could even give tribes in the Great Lakes region a legal framework to shut down Enbridge's Line 5 pipelines.

A woman texting on a cell phone.
Public Domain

The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday will hear the appeal of Timothy Carpenter, a man convicted of several armed robberies in Detroit and Northwest Ohio. The case started with the 2010 armed robbery of a RadioShack on Jefferson Avenue in Detroit, and a string of subsequent armed robberies. Because of how police used cell phone data to track suspects, Carpenter's appeal could have major implications for how courts interpret privacy rights in the online era.

How does an elite group of nine people shape everything from marriage and money, to safety and sex for an entire nation?  During the week of Oct 9-13, Michigan Radio will air a special five part series called More Perfect. Produced and hosted by Radiolab ‘s Jad Abumrad, More Perfect dives into the rarefied world of the Supreme Court to explain how cases deliberated inside hallowed halls affect lives far away from the bench.

The U.S. Supreme Court building
U.S. Supreme Court

The Supreme Court of the United States announced a number of orders Monday, including the rejection of two Michigan appeals cases.

The justices left in place an appeals court ruling that said federal mug shots don't have to be released to the press under the federal Freedom of Information Act.

Andrea_44 / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The U.S. Supreme Court has turned away an appeal from General Motors Co. seeking to block dozens of lawsuits over faulty ignition switches that could expose the company to billions of dollars in additional claims.

The justices on Monday left in place a lower court ruling that said the automaker's 2009 bankruptcy did not shield it from liability in the cases.

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