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vaccination

Dr. Khaldun speaking at an elementary school.
Photo provided by Andrea Poole

Health officials are worried about the drop in routine childhood vaccination rates over the past year, especially as schools start soon.

Over half of Michigan’s counties’ rates dropped below 70%, according to the state's Chief Medical Executive, Dr. Joneigh Khaldun, and data from June.

young Black teen receives a vaccine in his right arm
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According to the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, 31% of Michigan children are not up to date on CDC-recommended childhood vaccinations.

Those vaccinations include MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) and DTaP (diptheria, tetanus, and whooping cough or pertussis).

Physicians and school administrators across the state want kids up to date on all their shots when they come back to school in-person this fall. 

Dr. Mark Hamed is the president of the Michigan Academy of Family Physicians, and the director of emergency medical services for McKenzie Health.

blank vaccine registration cards sitting on a table
Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

Today, on Stateside, we discuss the legality of requiring employees to get a vaccine. Plus, a doctor in training writes about her time at a Detroit hospital during the early months of the pandemic.

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A teenage girl in a striped shirt looks down at her arm as a doctor in protective gear administers a vaccine
Adobe Stock

Today on Stateside, what Michigan parents should know about the news that Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine will soon be available to kids as young as 12 years old. And speaking of vaccinations, the state hit its first benchmark in Governor Gretchen Whitmer’s “MI Vacc to Normal” plan with 55% of Michiganders now having received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine. Plus, why recycling in Michigan isn’t as green as it could be.

Violinist holds violin and looks at sheet music
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Today, on Stateside, we break down the numbers from the U.S. Census and what they mean for redistricting in Michigan. Plus, a conversation with longtime radio journalist Vickie Thomas about living and working in Detroit for 30 years. 

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If COVID-19 vaccine supplies ramp up as promised in the next few months, half of all adults in Michigan could be fully vaccinated by the end of May, the state epidemiologist said this week.

 

Currently, more than 1.6 million administered doses have been reported to the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, with 13.7% of eligible residents having received at least their first dose. That’s up from 11.6% last week, state epidemiologist Sarah Lyon-Callo said at a press conference earlier this week.

black and white archive photo of two nurses wearing masks.
National Archives

Today, on Stateside, a new state budget paves the way into another uncertain year. Also, a discussion about how undocumented immigrants have been shut out of federal aid during the pandemic.

Mayor Mike Duggan says the city is expanding options for Detroiters over age 65 to get a COVID-19 vaccination.

Duggan says the city will be providing low-cost or no cost rides to a vaccination clinic at the TCF center.  And for the next four Saturdays, the mayor says the city will be providing special vaccination clinics just for seniors. 

man receives a COVID-19 vaccine shot in his right arm
Spectrum Health

State health department officials say they want more COVID-19 vaccine clinics in Michigan with longer hours. 

Officials with the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services laid out their strategy for getting 70% of Michigan residents vaccinated in the coming months.  The exact timetable is dependent on the supply of vaccines.