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Yemeni Americans

red and orange tulips in front of windmill in holland michigan
City of Holland

Today on Stateside, Republicans in the Michigan Senate want counties to lose some jail funding if they limit law enforcement from cooperating with federal immigration officials. We get reaction from Wayne County Sheriff Benny Napoleon. Plus, it is the 90th annual Tulip Time festival in Holland. We hear about how tulips came to be a symbol of the city's Dutch heritage.

Baby's breath, an invasive flower affecting the Great Lakes sand dunes
Sarah Lamar

Today on Stateside, a Wayne State University law professor remembers Judge Damon Keith, the longest-serving black judge in American history who died Sunday at age 96. Plus, why the popular flower baby’s breath poses a threat to the coastal sand dunes of the Great Lakes.

The untold history of Yemeni sailors on the Great Lakes

Apr 29, 2019
Group of Yemeni sailors interviewed during Howell's class
Razi Jafri / Michigan Radio

Our state is home to the nation's largest population of Yemeni Americans. But what attracted Yemeni immigrants to Michigan in the first place?

For many, the driver was economic opportunity, particularly the kind that could be found while sailing the Great Lakes.

Wikimedia Commons

The Trump administration has extended temporary protections for some Yemenis currently living in the U.S., but the decision also leaves others in a state of limbo.

lawandborder.com

A Michigan group is suing the U.S. State Department for allegedly holding up passports, visas, green cards and other paperwork filed by Yemeni-American Muslims. 

The Council on American Islamic Relations Michigan filed suit against the federal government today on behalf of a Wayne County man.

Sarah Alvarez

In honor of July 4th, we asked immigrants across Michigan what America means to them. Abdo Najy shared his story.

Abdo Najy has just recently completed his PhD and hopes to run his own lab soon. He's friendly, smiles a lot, and is animated when he talks about his research on breast and prostate cancer. 

Najy is modest and measured, but he knows he has a role in the search for a cure to cancer. He views his work as a scientist as his way to repay this country for educational opportunities he would not have had in his native Yemen. 

Born in Yemen in the 1980’s in the midst of a polio outbreak, Najy contracted the disease when he was just six months old.

A Dearborn soccer field was the site of a traditional Muslim prayer service Friday.

But it was more than that—an effort to show visible solidarity with protesters in Yemen, who have spent nine months in mass demonstrations against the 34-year regime of President President Ali Abdullah Saleh.

Like the recent pro-democracy movements in other Arab countries, the protests in Yemen have been fueled by youth frustrations.