© 2021 MICHIGAN RADIO
91.7 Ann Arbor/Detroit 91.3 Port Huron 104.1 Grand Rapids 91.1 Flint
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
Weather

Assessing the damage from flooding in Midland & Isabella counties

A car sits in the flooded parking lot of Midland's downtown farmers' market.
steve carmody
/
Michigan Radio
A car sits in the parking lot of Midland's downtown farmers' market.

As floodwaters begin to recede, government officials are assessing the damage in Midland and Isabella counties. 

Storms dumped more than seven inches of rain on parts of mid-Michigan last week, flooding homes and washing out roads.

“In Midland County alone, there’s been 116 roads affected,” says Mark Bone, president of the Midland County Board of Commissioners. “There’s a lot of roads out there we’re still gathering the information, but there’s a lot of damage.”

Getting to work or school is going to be a problem in the areas affected by the flooding.

“There’s a lot of thoroughfares that people use to come in to go to work.  We’re trying to get them fixed,” says State Rep. Roger Hauck. 

Meanwhile, the clock is winding down for the state to apply for federal aid.

Lt. Gov. Brian Calley declared a state of disaster last week.

The governor’s office only has until Monday evening to finish assessing the damage and submit its request for help from Washington.

Midland and Isabella county officials are urging property owners to fill out the necessary forms to report damage.

Meanwhile, rivers are still rising, cresting and falling in the affected areas.

The Tittabawassee River in Midland is expected to start receding tomorrow. City officials are keeping an eye on the city’s landmark Tridge. The three-legged bridge spans the river and connects city parks on along the river. The Tridge has been undergoing renovations, which have been delayed by the high waters.