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Firefly or lightning bug on a flower
Radim Schreiber

A “firefly boom” is lighting up Michigan backyards this summer

Does it feel like you've seen a burst of fireflies this summer? You probably have! This year will go down as a "firefly boom," not just here in Michigan, but across the country.

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Cheyna Roth / MPRN

A billionaire took his fight to impeach President Donald Trump to Lansing Monday. This time with a slightly new message.

Tom Steyer, a Democratic activist and hedge fund manager, launched his Need to Vote campaign – with 10 million dollars going toward the effort. The plan is from now until the general election in November, to get as many people to vote as possible. The goal is to elect enough people to national office across the US that are willing to impeach Trump that the president can be removed from office.

Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

A new federal grant will help Detroit expand the historic district around the site of an iconic civil rights battle.

That battle took place in 1925, when African-American doctor Ossian Sweet’s family moved into a new home on Garland Street on Detroit’s east side. At the time, it was an all-white neighborhood.

recycle cone
Ben Simo / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

From Ann Arbor to Grand Rapids, communities all across Michigan are paying more to recycle their trash. 

That’s thanks to a change in China’s stance on accepting recycling products from the U.S.  

Dar Baas, the director of the Kent County Department of Public Works, joined Stateside to talk to us about the financial impact this Chinese policy is having on operations there.

Abdul El-Sayed
Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

It's been 534 days since Abdul El-Sayed announced his candidacy for the governor of Michigan. It's been nearly a week since he finished second in the primary to Gretchen Whitmer.

As a candidate, El-Sayed rallied many younger, progressive voters with his promise to establish a single-payer healthcare system, and his refusal to take corporate money in an effort to keep dark money out of politics, among others.

He joined Stateside for an exclusive interview to talk about the future of the Democratic party and what work needs to be done in Michigan.

Water faucet
user william_warby / Flickr http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

Low-income households across metro Detroit can't afford their water bills, and new research from the University of Michigan says there’s now an affordability gap: people are paying more for water than they can actually afford.

Derek Smith
Sarah Leeson / Michigan Radio

When you think of a mandolin, you may think of Europe during the Renaissance or bluegrass music from the South. But it turns out the mandolin actually has roots right here in Michigan.

This past weekend, mandolin enthusiasts descended on Marshall, Michigan for the Marshall Mandolin Summit. Visitors spent the weekend sharing their love for the instrument and learning under world-renowned mandolin players like Don Julin, author of Mandolin for Dummiesand Mike Marshall (no relation to the town).

Wave card being used on a bus in Grand Rapids
Bryce Huffman / Michigan Radio

Grand Rapids’ bus service wants to be more efficient and help the environment. That’s why it’s introducing a new electronic fare system Tuesday.

The new Wave cards will replace the paper tickets and change that riders usually pay with.

JIM D / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

In 2015, the Grand Traverse Land Conservancy began a quiet campaign to protect natural lands from development in northern Michigan. Since the launch, $53 million has been raised, and 19 areas spanning five counties have been identified as in need of urgent protection.

The Land Conservancy has named it “The Campaign for Generations,” and opened the campaign to the public on August 11 to raise more money for the campaign.

Marijuana plant
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

A state board has approved 16 medical marijuana licenses. Licenses have been approved at all stages of the medical marijuana system– from dispensaries to testing labs. But there’s been some concern about having enough pot shops open for patients.

Starting September 15th, any dispensary that doesn’t have a license will have to close.

David Harns is a spokesperson for the Bureau of Medical Marihuana Regulation. He says once the deadline hits, there should be enough open dispensaries to meet the need.

DWSD sewer
Detroit Water and Sewerage Department

On July 1, the Detroit Water and Sewerage Department completed its phase-in of a new drainage rate for residential properties.

The department expects to collect $153 million from the rate in 2019, roughly $30 million more than it will collect from water rates.


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Issues & Ale: Seeing Green in Lake Erie

Mon, August 20, 6:30 PM
Black Cloister Brewing Company, Toledo

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