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Stateside Staff

ford field
meesh / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

Today on Stateside, a Michigan official responds to the controversy surrounding Wisconsin’s quiet approval of a 2010 request to divert nearly 11 million gallons of Great Lakes water per day. Plus, a comic book that explores the repatriation of Native American remains and the relationship between indigenous tribes and museums.

album cover of space odyssey soundtrack
User Per-Olof Forsberg / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Today on Stateside, why a large diversion of Lake Michigan water approved by the state of Wisconsin in 2010 is drawing new scrutiny. Plus, ringing in the first weekend of fall with a Michigan version of a tropical cocktail.  

satellite map of Michigan, the Great Lakes
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

When Peter Annin, director of the Burke Center for Freshwater Innovation at Northland College, was completing research for an updated version of his book The Great Lakes Water Wars, he discovered a detail about Great Lakes water diversions that had gone unnoticed for 8 years.

According to his findings, the state of Wisconsin never announced that in 2010, it approved the village of Pleasant Prairie's request to extract seven million gallons of water per day from Lake Michigan, the largest water diversion in the state.

fracking well
Tim Evanson / Wikimedia Commons / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Today on Stateside, Democratic Congressman Dan Kildee discusses what he is doing to prevent the deportation of a 48-year-old man from Nigeria who is deaf and has cognitive disabilities. Plus, University of Michigan Professor Daniel Raimi breaks down the risks, myths, and benefits of fracking.

Francis Anwana
Courtesy of Francis Anwana

Debbie Stabenow being interviewed by Cynthia Canty
Matt Williams

Today on Stateside, U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow (D) on how a trade war with China is hurting Michigan businesses. Plus, Holocaust survivor Irene Butter explains why, after decades of silence, she started talking about her family’s experience during WW2.

 

Detroit Music Magazine founder and publisher Paul Young talks about the musical path set by long-time staples of Detroit’s electronic and art music scene.

 

Holocaust survivor Irene Butter talks about her family’s life before and after World War 2, as detailed in her recent memoir Shores Beyond Shores: From Holocaust to Hope, My True Story.

Motor Corps and Canteen volunteers from the Detroit chapter of the American Red Cross, taking a break from delivering supplies to influenza victims.
NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION

Today on Stateside, Libertarian gubernatorial candidate Bill Gelineau says he would cut Medicaid costs by rewarding young women for not getting pregnant before age 23. Plus, 100 years ago, the world’s deadliest flu pandemic hit Michigan and killed roughly 19,000 people.

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

Shelter leader responds to complaints from homeless Kalamazoo residents in ongoing protests

Bryce Huffman

Update: 8:30 a.m. on Sept. 19

Kalamazoo police officers arrived at Bronson Park this morning to clear the park of homeless people and protestors.

The city imposed a deadline of 7 p.m. Tuesday night for homeless campers to leave the park.

Some people have been arrested, including city commissioner Shannon Sykes.

Gilda Radner in LOVE, GILDA, a Magnolia Pictures Release.
Courtesy of Magnolia Pictures

Today on Stateside, a young activist in Detroit is appealing her conviction for pulling an unloaded gun on another woman in what she says was self-defense. Plus, the ups and downs of the family restaurant are the focus of Ann Arbor writer Lillian Li’s debut novel.

hospital exterior
Michigan Medicine

Nurses at the University of Michigan hospital have voted to authorize their union to call a three-day work stoppage if the university does not respond to claims of unfair labor practices. Ninety-four percent of the votes were in favor of the authorization.

child coloring with crayons
Unsplash / Aaron Burden

Today on Stateside, we hear from Kalamazoo’s city manager about the response to protests over homelessness in the city. Plus, parents aren’t the only ones with long lists of school supplies to buy before the year starts—teachers are spending their own money on classroom essentials, too.

City manager addresses protests over homelessness in Kalamazoo

person getting their blood pressure taken
Unsplash

This election year, Stateside is doing some quick interviews on one topic with the candidates running for governor. You can find all our coverage of the gubernatorial race here

Today, we’re talking about Medicaid work requirements and the future of the Healthy Michigan Plan, which is the state-run Medicaid expansion.

Haleem "Stringz" Rasul dances with Zimbabwe dancer Francis "Franco Slomo" Dhaka during a trip to Zimbabwe
Zimbabwe Cultural Centre of Detroit

On today’s Stateside, we answer your questions about what happens if Michigan voters legalize recreational marijuana. And, the story of broadcast executive and former Detroit Tigers owner John Fetzer’s exploration of new-age spiritual movements.

 Reimund Holzhey mugshot
Courtesy of Michigan History Center

Today on Stateside, after a contentious city council meeting, Kalamazoo is moving to meet the demands of homeless protestors camped out in a downtown park. Plus, nationally-recognized teacher Matinga Ragatz talks about why she thinks school reform is hurting, not helping, students.

northern lights above the mackinac bridge
Wall Boat / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Today on Stateside, an explosive lawsuit against Michigan State University alleges that Larry Nassar raped an MSU athlete in 1992, and university officials covered it up. Plus, the best plays and musicals from Michigan’s local theater scene this month.

Justin Kasper, associate professor in the department of Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering at the University of Michigan, tells us what’s causing tonight’s northern lights display in Michigan.

Candius Stearns / https://www.candiusforcongress.com/bio

For 35 years, Congressman Sander Levin has represented people from parts of Oakland and Macomb counties. 

a collection of glowing rocks known as "yooperlites"
Erik Rintamaki

Today on Stateside, why President Trump's tweets are unlikely to change Ford's decision to move small car production abroad. Plus, why rocks in the U.P. are giving off an alien glow. (No, it does not involve extraterrestrials.)

Listen above for the full show, or find individual segments below. 

Ford won’t be moving production of Focus hatchback to the U.S. Here’s why.

Andy Levin
Andy Levin campaign

For 35 years, Congressman Sander Levin has represented people from parts of Oakland and Macomb counties. 

The Democratic congressman from Michigan's 9th District is retiring at the end of the year, and his son, Andy, is running for that seatAndy Levin joined Stateside to tell us about why he joined the race. 

children lined up on a sidewalk
Airman 1st Class Lausanne Morgan / U.S. Air Force

Today on Stateside, Governor Rick Snyder announced he's striking a question about past felony convictions from some state job and license applications. And, what should schools do with millions of dollars in school safety grants from the state? 

Erick Senkmajer (L) and Erika Senecal (R).
Joe Linstroth / Michigan Radio

On today's Stateside, the Republican-controlled state Legislature passes two progressive ballot proposals, giving them the power to amend the laws with a simple majority. Plus, two Port Huron teachers reflect on teaching high school music when you're just starting out, and when you've been doing it for 27 years.  

Music teachers Erick Senkmajer and Erika Senecal
Joe Linstroth / Michigan Radio

Taking that first step down a career path can be daunting, like stepping into a world completely unknown.

On the flip side, if you've been walking that path a while, odds are you've learned a thing or two.

Orange construction barrels
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

On today's Stateside, you've probably seen pictures of plastic pollution in the ocean forming giant islands or entrapping sea animals. But what happens when plastic gets into the Great Lakes? Plus, a Michigan chaplain pushing for prison reform in the 1930s wanted to enrich inmates lives with art. 

Sleeping Bear Dunes, a popular tourist spot in Northern Michigan
Flickr user Rodney Campbell / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

On today's Stateside, the students in Detroit's public schools are starting the year drinking bottled water after high levels of copper and lead were found in some drinking fountains. Plus, trips to Michigan's sand dunes are a classic summer activity, but could climate change reshape the state's beloved natural landmarks? 

Today on Stateside, why Republicans might be eyeing an adoption of paid sick leave and mininum wage proposals before they make it to the ballot. Plus, how your neighborhood can help, or hurt, your health. 

michigan state university sign
Branislav Ondrasik / Wikimedia Commons / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

A recent editorial in Inside Higher Ed called on academia to “confront the power dynamics that can make academia a haven for predatory behavior and abuse.”

It was jointly signed by eight deans at Michigan State University, a school rocked by the conviction of Larry Nassar. The former sports doctor and MSU employee abused hundreds of girls and women under the guise of treatment.

neighborhood
Brandon Jacoby / Unsplash

Past research has indicated that where you live can affect your health. But what factors go into that, and how do you know just how bad or good your neighborhood is for you health?

AcrylicArtist / MorgueFile

 


The Michigan Legislature will return from summer break next week, and Republicans are discussing the potential of adopting two proposals headed to the ballot this November. 

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