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Steve Carmody

Mid Michigan Reporter/Producer

Steve Carmody has been a reporter for Michigan Radio since 2005. Steve previously worked at public radio and television stations in Florida, Oklahoma and Kentucky, and also has extensive experience in commercial broadcasting. During his two and a half decades in broadcasting, Steve has won numerous awards, including accolades from the Associated Press and Radio and Television News Directors Association. Away from the broadcast booth, Steve is an avid reader and movie fanatic.

Q&A

What person, alive or dead, would you like to have lunch with? Why?
My wife. She’s the best company I’ve ever had, or expect to, over lunch.
 
How did you get involved in radio?
I started listening to all news radio when I was about 8 years old. In my teens, when other kids were listening to rock stations, I was flipping between KYW and WCAU in Philadelphia. I was fascinated listening to the news developing and changing through the day. When the time came to decide on what I wanted to study at college, I was drawn to broadcasting and journalism. I spent most of my four years in college at the campus radio station, including two years as news director.  
 
What is your favorite way to spend your free time?
I read (usually two books at a time, one book at work, another at home) and I go to see a lot of movies (about 50 or more a year)
 
What has been your most memorable experience as a reporter/host/etc.?
Covering the federal building bombing in Oklahoma City in 1995 was a remarkable experience. It was going to be a quiet day newswise. Not much happening. I was at the state capitol to cover a rally. The earth shattering explosion changed that. I spent the next ten hours wandering around downtown, filing reports to my home station and NPR. For the next six weeks, it was literally the only story my station covered.
 
What one song do you think best summarizes your taste in music?
Zilch. I don’t listen to music.
 
What is your favorite program on Michigan Radio? Why?
This American Life. It’s the best story telling on radio.
 
What's a hidden talent you have that most people don’t know about?
I have no talent. Anyone who knows me well would agree.
 
What is one ability or talent you really wish you possessed?
The ability to cook.
 
What do you like best about working in public radio?
I like having the time to tell a story. I’ve grown tired over time working in commercial radio of trying to tell a complex story in 25 seconds or less. You can tell some stories in less than 25 seconds. But often, a truly interesting story needs a minute, 3 minutes or more to explain.
 
If you could interview any contemporary newsmaker, who would it be?
No one really.
 
Is there a T.V. show you never miss? If so, which one?
The Amazing Race. As a fan and a former contestant, I just enjoy the thrill of seeing different parts of the world.
 
What would your perfect meal consist of?
A light appetizer. A good fish course. A well done steak. A pleasant dessert. A fine 20 year tawny port.
 
What modern convenience would it be most difficult for you to live without?
The computer. It has changed my personal and professional life.
 
What are people usually very surprised to learn about you?
That I not only watch Reality TV, but that I’ve been a Reality TV star (retired).
 
What else would you like people to know about you?
I enjoy living in Jackson, MI. So many Michigan cities and towns are struggling these days. Jackson’s no different. But, the people there are forging ahead. Jackson is also committed to being a community. 

Ways to Connect

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A Michigan school district is facing a federal lawsuit over past sexual harassment.

Wednesday, the U.S. Justice Department filed a lawsuit against the Allegan Area Educational Service Agency (AAESA). The agency provides support, cooperative educational programs, and services to local school districts in Allegan County.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

On Tuesday, voters in Genesee County will decide whether tax dollars should help fund the Flint Cultural Center and other arts organizations.

The proposed millage would generate close to $9 million a year. Most of it would go to the crowns of Flint’s cultural institutions, including the Flint Institute of Arts, the Whiting Auditorium and the Sloan museum.

Museum executive director Todd Slisher says a declining donor base is creating a problem for the institutions that traditionally relied on private support.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

For the second time, voters in East Lansing are being asked to approve a city income tax.

The proposal on Tuesday’s ballot would create a one percent income tax for East Lansing residents and half a percent for non-residents who work in the city.

Gary Beaudoin is a spokesman for the YES campaign.   He says the money generated from the income tax will help East Lansing address its legacy labor costs and other issues.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

U.S. District Judge Judith Levy ruled Wednesday that a class action lawsuit in the Flint water crisis can move forward.  

But the judge dismissed Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder from the litigation. 

Chrystal McCadden stands next to a photo showing her son in handcuffs.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The city of Flint is being sued after one of its police officers handcuffed a disabled seven-year-old boy in 2015. 

The boy was handcuffed by the officer, who was working as a school resource officer, after instructors at an after-school program called for help in dealing with what the family's attorneys call “behavioral challenges.”  

DANIEL WEBER / FLICKR

A new University of Michigan study finds young people are supportive of more gun control and of guns.

The University of Michigan School of Public Health conducts a regular text message poll of young people, between the ages of 14 to 24 years old.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A pilot program is giving Flint teenagers the opportunity to learn new skills, while helping city residents still too scared to trust their drinking water is safe.

Recent tests have shown the quality of Flint’s tap water has improved since the city’s water crisis started in 2014. However, many residents don’t believe those tests results from the government.

But under a new program, more than a dozen Flint teenagers are going into homes and testing the water.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Jackson County voters are being warned they could lose some of their county parks, unless voters OK a new millage on August 7th.  

Jackson County maintains 17 parks and a ten-mile-long scenic bike trail.   

But county Parks Director Jeff Hovarter says past budget cuts have reduced needed maintenance.

He says, without the $2 million a year the millage on the August ballot would provide, the alternative is “rightsizing our park system.”  Hovarter says that may involve closing some parks, selling others to developers or transferring parks to townships.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

New campaign finance reports suggest this year’s governor’s race may end up being the most expensive in Michigan history.

The August primary will select the Democratic, Republican and Libertarian party nominees for governor. 

MDHHS Director Nick Lyon
Steve Carmody

It will be another month before a judge decides whether the head of Michigan’s state health department should stand trial on involuntary manslaughter charges.

Nick Lyon is the director of the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services.  He was in that job when a deadly Legionnaires Disease outbreak occurred in Genesee County in 2014 and 2015. At least a dozen people died.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

With just two weeks left before the August 7 primary, a top contender for the Republican nomination for governor is under fire over how often he shows up for the job he has now.

“On duty” is how Bill Schuette often refers to his tenure as Michigan attorney general.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The Michigan Civil Rights Commission says it will continue to include LGBTQ people as a group protected under anti-discrimination law, no matter what Michigan’s Attorney General says.

In May, the civil rights commission decided to include LGBTQ individuals as members of a protected class under Michigan’s Elliott-Larsen Civil Rights Act.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

This week, Flint Community Schools will take an important step toward finding its next permanent superintendent.

An interim superintendent has overseen the district since Bilal Tawwab was let go this past spring. Former emergency manager Gregory Weatherspoon was hired in March to serve as interim superintendent.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A prominent figure in the Flint water crisis is suing several people who worked together with him to reveal the city’s lead tainted tap water.

The relationship between Virginia Tech professor Marc Edwards and several prominent Flint activists has been deteriorating for years.

The suit names activists Melissa Mays and Paul Schwartz, as well as former Edwards’ research associate Yanna Lambrinidou as defendants. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

This week, a judge will decide whether a top state official will face trial on charges related to the Flint water crisis.

State Health Department Director Nick Lyon has spent the past ten months listening as attorneys have argued over evidence and witness testimony in his preliminary hearing.

That ends Wednesday.

Judge David Goggins is scheduled to decide if Lyon will stand trial on involuntary manslaughter and other charges.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A dozen members of Congress received an update Friday on the Flint water crisis.

The group, all Democrats, met with city residents and inspected a pipe replacement project on the city’s north side.

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi says they remained committed to helping Flint recover.

“It’s not just about Flint and water,” Pelosi told reporters as she stood next to an open pit where crews were replacing a lead service line. “It’s about our responsibilities to each other in our country to make the future better.”

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson Thursday handed a large novelty check to Flint Mayor Karen Weaver. 

The amount written on the check was anything but a novelty: $30 million.   

Flint is one of five cities receiving money through the HUD Choice Neighborhoods grant program.  The money is earmarked to replace decaying public housing in the city.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A report by the EPA’s Inspector General blames “management weakness” for delays in the federal agency’s response to the Flint, Michigan water crisis.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Candidates for Michigan governor in next month’s primary are sharply divided, along party lines, when it comes to legalizing recreational marijuana.

In November, Michigan voters will not only decide who will be the state’s next governor, but also whether to legalize recreational marijuana.

If the candidates running to be governor are any indication, marijuana legalization may come down to largely party-line vote.

The four Republican candidates for governor oppose legal pot. While the three Democrats and two Libertarian candidates support it.

children sitting on floor
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A new University of Michigan study finds African-American boys are three times as likely as whites to be suspended or expelled from school before the fourth grade.

The study suggests a lack of alternatives to suspending or expulsion may be a reason.

This map shows areas of concern in the Oscoda area.  PFAs has been slowly spreading for the former U.S. Air Force base for decades.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Several Michigan members of Congress are sending a letter to the Trump administration requesting stronger safeguards for dangerous chemicals in drinking water.

A recent Harvard study found six million Americans are drinking water contaminated with a group of chemicals,  per- and polyfluoroalkyl chemicals, better known as PFAS.

The chemicals have been linked to an increased risk of liver damage and pregnancy problems, among other health issues.

http://en.kremlin.ru

Michigan U.S. Senator Gary Peters is accusing Russian President Vladimir Putin of “playing games” with the United States.

Peters says he wanted President Trump to “call out” Putin for interfering with the 2016 U.S. presidential election during their summit meeting in Helsinki, Finland today.

Official White House portrait

U.S. Rep. Debbie Dingell, D-Michigan, is joining other Democrats in demanding that President Trump address Russian interference in the 2016 election when he meets with Vladimir Putin Monday.

“President Trump needs to be discussing with [Putin] and holding him accountable for what is documented Russian interference in the basic process of democracy in this country,” says Dingell.

Last week, a special prosecutor indicted a dozen Russian government officials on charges they hacked email accounts belonging to top Democratic Party officials in 2016.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Hundreds of Michigan Medicine nurses rallied outside the Ann Arbor hospital complex today.

Wearing red shirts, waving signs and chanting “Union busting, that’s disgusting,” the nurses called on hospital administrators to agree to a new contract.  

The old contract for the 6,000 nurses expired June 30.  

U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit

Both of Michigan’s United States senators announced today they will oppose President Trump's choice to fill a vacancy on the U.S. Supreme Court.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A judge must now decide if there is enough evidence to send Michigan’s health director to trial on involuntary manslaughter charges. Closing arguments came today in Nick Lyon's preliminary hearing.

Lyon is charged in connection with a Legionnaires' disease outbreak in Genesee County from 2014 to 2015 that killed at least a dozen people. The charges against him are related to two men who died in 2015. 

Lyon and other state health department officials were aware of the outbreak in January 2015. But a public announcement was not made until a year later.   

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

This week could be pivotal for a massive class action lawsuit connected to the Flint water crisis. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow (D-MI) says she has concerns about some of the individuals President Trump is considering naming to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Though she declines to say which of the prospective candidates to fill the vacancy on the nation’s highest court concern her.

Trump is promising to select a "great" Supreme Court nominee to fill the vacancy of retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy. He’s expected to name his choice Monday.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Starting July 4th, Michigan law enforcement agencies will be required to use a national database to search for missing persons.

The National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, or NamUs, is a national clearinghouse for missing, unidentified, and unclaimed person cases throughout the United States. NamUs was launched in 2007 by the U.S. Justice Department. 

But some Michigan law enforcement agencies have been slow to use it.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Democrats running for governor were busy today walking in parades, handing out candy to children, while talking to their parents about voting in next month’s primary.

With one month to go in the campaign before the August primary, candidate Gretchen Whitmer says it’s “all hands on deck.”

“We’re on the doors. We’re on the phones. I’m attending events across Michigan at senior centers or parades,” Whitmer said as she waited for the start of Wyandotte’s 4th of July parade, her second parade of the morning. 

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