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Steve Carmody

Mid Michigan Reporter/Producer

Steve Carmody has been a reporter for Michigan Radio since 2005. Steve previously worked at public radio and television stations in Florida, Oklahoma and Kentucky, and also has extensive experience in commercial broadcasting. During his two and a half decades in broadcasting, Steve has won numerous awards, including accolades from the Associated Press and Radio and Television News Directors Association. Away from the broadcast booth, Steve is an avid reader and movie fanatic.

Q&A

What person, alive or dead, would you like to have lunch with? Why?
My wife. She’s the best company I’ve ever had, or expect to, over lunch.
 
How did you get involved in radio?
I started listening to all news radio when I was about 8 years old. In my teens, when other kids were listening to rock stations, I was flipping between KYW and WCAU in Philadelphia. I was fascinated listening to the news developing and changing through the day. When the time came to decide on what I wanted to study at college, I was drawn to broadcasting and journalism. I spent most of my four years in college at the campus radio station, including two years as news director.  
 
What is your favorite way to spend your free time?
I read (usually two books at a time, one book at work, another at home) and I go to see a lot of movies (about 50 or more a year)
 
What has been your most memorable experience as a reporter/host/etc.?
Covering the federal building bombing in Oklahoma City in 1995 was a remarkable experience. It was going to be a quiet day newswise. Not much happening. I was at the state capitol to cover a rally. The earth shattering explosion changed that. I spent the next ten hours wandering around downtown, filing reports to my home station and NPR. For the next six weeks, it was literally the only story my station covered.
 
What one song do you think best summarizes your taste in music?
Zilch. I don’t listen to music.
 
What is your favorite program on Michigan Radio? Why?
This American Life. It’s the best story telling on radio.
 
What's a hidden talent you have that most people don’t know about?
I have no talent. Anyone who knows me well would agree.
 
What is one ability or talent you really wish you possessed?
The ability to cook.
 
What do you like best about working in public radio?
I like having the time to tell a story. I’ve grown tired over time working in commercial radio of trying to tell a complex story in 25 seconds or less. You can tell some stories in less than 25 seconds. But often, a truly interesting story needs a minute, 3 minutes or more to explain.
 
If you could interview any contemporary newsmaker, who would it be?
No one really.
 
Is there a T.V. show you never miss? If so, which one?
The Amazing Race. As a fan and a former contestant, I just enjoy the thrill of seeing different parts of the world.
 
What would your perfect meal consist of?
A light appetizer. A good fish course. A well done steak. A pleasant dessert. A fine 20 year tawny port.
 
What modern convenience would it be most difficult for you to live without?
The computer. It has changed my personal and professional life.
 
What are people usually very surprised to learn about you?
That I not only watch Reality TV, but that I’ve been a Reality TV star (retired).
 
What else would you like people to know about you?
I enjoy living in Jackson, MI. So many Michigan cities and towns are struggling these days. Jackson’s no different. But, the people there are forging ahead. Jackson is also committed to being a community. 

Ways to Connect

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

In Flint Monday, a judge will hear arguments over dismissing a lawsuit concerning police car chases.

In 2014, a state police trooper tried to conduct a traffic stop on a vehicle in Flint, which sped away. A high speed chase ensued. It ended when the fleeing vehicle caused a chain reaction crash that left one person dead and another permanently injured.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

As Michigan voters consider whether to legalize recreational marijuana, law enforcement agencies are assessing how to respond if the measure passes in November.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

There are plans to turn a run-down Lansing golf course into a $100 million mixed used development.

The rough on the old Waverly golf course has been growing wild for years. The city closed the golf course in 2007. City voters agreed to sell it in 2012. 

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A decision by the U.S. Supreme Court this week will likely have little effect on campaign spending in this fall’s election in Michigan.

The high court denied a request on Tuesday by Karl Rove’s Crossroads GPS, which sought to stay a lower court ruling forcing it to reveal its secret donors.   

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A defense lawyer wants a mental health evaluation for the man accused of carrying out a terrorist attack at Flint’s airport last year.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

In November, Michigan voters will decide if they want to legalize recreational marijuana.

Supporters say the industry that develops should be an economic boost for rural Michigan.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Absentee ballots will start arriving in Michigan mailboxes in the next few weeks. One county clerk is predicting confusion.

Genesee County Clerk John Gleason says about half his county’s voters routinely use the straight party ticket option, but starting this fall that won’t be an option.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

One analyst says Michigan and other parts of the county are turning from seller's to buyer's markets.

Daren Blomquist with Attom Data Solutions says mortgage originations dropped 27% nationally in the second quarter in 2018 compared to the previous year.  The drop was bigger in some Michigan markets.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan’s entrepreneurs are seeing dollar signs with the state’s vote in November to legalize recreational marijuana.

But many out-of-state interests are already moving in.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The Environmental Protection Agency has approved a plan that will allow the city of Flint to spend millions of dollars to replace thousands of water meters. 

The money is coming from $120 million set aside by the federal and state governments to help Flint recover from its water crisis.

Flint Chief Financial Officer Hughey Newsome says the new meters should help the city improve its water bill collections and reduce water theft. Newsome admits right now they’re not sure where all the city water is going.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Nearly six thousand nurses at the University of Michigan are voting on a possible work stoppage.

The nurses’ union contract with the university health system expired over the summer.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Attorneys for Michigan’s state health department director are asking a judge to block a lower court decision to send a case against him to trial.

The charges are related to the Flint water crisis.

Last month, a district court judge decided the state had presented enough evidence to warrant binding over State Health and Human Services Director Nick Lyon for trial.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Two new studies suggest Medicaid work requirement proposals will end up kicking off qualified people from the health care program.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan voters will decide a ballot question in November that would open up the voting process.

The state Board of Canvassers certified the “Promote the Vote” petition Thursday. The board will consider final ballot language Friday.

KAYE LAFOND / Michigan Radio

The federal government has again rejected Michigan’s request for federal assistance to Upper Peninsula residents hit hard by flooding in June.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Prosecutors and police say a Catholic priest’s ‘no contest’ pleas to sexual abuse charges this week will give his victims closure.

Father Robert Deland was scheduled to face the first of three trials this week. The charges related to incidents involving three young men, between the ages of 17 and 21. But before jury selection could begin, Deland entered 'no contest' pleas to six felony and one misdemeanor charge. 

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Tuesday is the first day of school for many children in Michigan.

In Flint, about two dozen motorcycles greeted students as they arrived for classes at Doyle Ryder elementary.  Some students covered their ears as riders throttled up their engines to a low roar.  

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Charter school groups and state lawmakers are complaining about how the Michigan Department of Education plans to count students enrolling in cyber schools.

All Michigan schools must provide a minimum of 1,098 hours of instruction throughout the school year, under Section 101 of the State School Aid Act.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A new University of Michigan study finds expanded Medicaid coverage is increasing access to family planning and birth control for poor women in Michigan.

Michigan expanded its Medicaid program in 2014 as part of the Affordable Care Act.   In all, 32 states and the District of Columbia have expanded Medicaid programs under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

More than 600,000 Michiganders receive health care coverage through the Healthy Michigan program.  

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Starting Friday, a new water plant will begin treating contaminated groundwater near the old Wurtsmith Air Force Base in Oscoda.

The base was decommissioned in 1993. But man-made chemicals known as PFAS (Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances) have been slowly leaching into the neighboring community’s groundwater for decades.  

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Tens of thousands of people in northern Lower Michigan are still waiting to get their electricity turned back on.

Severe storms Tuesday night into Wednesday knocked out power to more than 150,000 Consumers Energy and Great Lakes Energy Cooperative customers.

drinking fountain
Pixabay

As Michigan children return to school, the state still has yet to complete testing to determine if there are contaminants in their drinking water.

For months a special task force has been testing school and municipal water systems for PFAS, a manufactured chemical linked to numerous health problems including cancer.

Albion College

This week, Albion College will return a religious relic to a Native American tribe. 

The two-foot tall wooden statue belongs to the Zuni nation in New Mexico. The war god idol was donated to Albion’s collection 45 years ago. But only recently did the college realize the idol’s significance and the need to return it to the tribe.  

The Zuni have spent decades trying to reclaim artifacts removed from their tribal lands.

“Most of them that have come into public collections are objects that were taken away from Zuni lands.  They were taken from alters that are out in the open,” says Bille Wickre, an art history professor at Albion. 

Wickre discovered the idol in the college’s collection while preparing to teach a class on Native American art.  

Federal law requires institutions to return artifacts to Native American tribes.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

State Senator Jim Ananich (D-Flint) would like to see legislative hearings this fall into a report that state officials were aware of high PFAS levels detected in the Flint River before the city of Flint starting using it as its drinking water source.

MLive.com reports, while state officials were aware of the test results, they did not appear to inform Flint city leaders.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Thetford Township officials have put their recently arrested police chief on administrative leave without pay. 

Police Chief Robert Kenny was charged this week with embezzlement and obstruction of justice. He allegedly pocketed money as part of a scheme involving military surplus equipment. Kenny faces up to five years in prison on both counts if convicted. 

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A federal lawsuit filed Thursday is challenging Michigan’s no-fault auto insurance law.

Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan is among the plaintiffs suing the state Insurance agency. The other plaintiffs represent a wide mix of people from different parts of the state.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan's state health department director will stand trial for involuntary manslaughter tied to the Flint water crisis.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Flint mayor Karen Weaver is optimistic state officials are listening now to the city’s concerns about a method of checking for lead pipes.

Mayor Weaver sat down with state and local officials to discuss the current state of Flint’s recovery from its water crisis.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A judge is expected to decide Monday whether the head of the state health department should face trial on charges related to Flint’s water crisis.

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