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Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

When you write emails, what are your preferred greetings and sign-offs?  There are a lot of options, and your choice probably depends on the nature of the email. 

David Klein Gallery

A new exhibition is taking place at the David Klein Gallery in Detroit. Its title is “Old” and the artist is Scott Hocking.

Hocking joined Stateside to discuss his massive and, oftentimes, temporary sculptures and installations. He talked about how he chooses sites and materials for his installations, how he conveys his work to art consumers, and how his work in Detroit reflects what is happening in the city.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Wright and Company is a second floor restaurant and bar housed in a Queen Anne style commercial building done in brick with brownstone trim at 1500 Woodward in downtown Detroit.

The Cheers! team of Tammy Coxen of Tammy’s Tastings and Lester Graham were there for a surprise drink mixed by Mark Cooney.

One of the women crowned with a henna tattoo in Crowns of Courage
Kristen Hernandez

 

Stateside loves to hear from listeners with ideas for stories and people we should cover. Here's a great tip we got from Stateside listener, George Bollinger: Crowns of Courage

The art of decorating the body with henna is truly ancient, going back over 5,000 years.

 

The intricate henna tattoos might be applied simply for their beauty, or they can symbolize passages in life. 

The Founding

Today on Stateside, we play another mixtape of new music from West Michigan.

As always, John Sinkevics, editor and publisher of LocalSpins.com, put the mixtape together. This time, featured artists include The Go Rounds, Lady Ace Boogie, The Founding, and The Hacky Turtles.

Stateside 5.4.2018

May 4, 2018

Today on Stateside, we talk to attorney Mark Bernstein about the Michigan communities joining the lawsuit to get drugmakers to pay for the societal costs of the opioid crisis. And, in our latest edition of Artisans of Michigan, host Lester Graham visits a broom-squire near Rockford.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

We travel the state to find the people who make useful things with their hands as part of our ongoing series: Artisans of Michigan. This time our stop is in a rural area near Rockford.

“I make brooms, all kinds, different sizes, styles, colors. I like to use recycled materials: branches, golf clubs, old harnesses, lots of different things I put my brooms on,” Henry Tschetter of Brooms by Henry said.

He learned his trade when he was very young.

Herb Boyd, author of "Black Detroit: A People's History of Self-Determination." Boyd came to Detroit with his mother in the 1940s. He now teachers at The City College of New York and lives in Harlem, NY
Lester Graham

There are many histories of Detroit. The latest is a comprehensive look at the contributions, accomplishments and long-suffering of the African Americans who have called Detroit home.

The book is Black Detroit: A People’s History of Self-Determination by Herb Boyd, son of Detroit and an instructor at The City College of New York currently teaching African American history. Boyd now lives in Harlem.

the band nessa
Nessa

Let’s talk about Celtic music. Nessa, a Southeast Michigan band, re-imagines the ballads and dance tunes of the old Celtic world, bringing in a wide range of musical styles.

The ensemble is led by Kelly McDermott, who plays the flute and sings. She joined Stateside to talk about her musical influences, Celtic fusion, and the release of her new EP, Travel Walk to Celtica, produced by Brian Bill.

There's been a lot of talk about reviving and restoring Michigan Central – the once-proud train station in Detroit's Corktown.

There's another piece of history that needs some of that attention: the Detroit house where the man who won the Civil War for the Union and then went on to become president once lived.

Stateside 4.30.2018

Apr 30, 2018

Today on Stateside, we learn what one Michigan town does to keep the tourists coming, and coming back. And, we learn a pop-up restaurant in Hamtramck will serve up "discomfort food" this week. Also today, we hear from a Holocaust survivor who hopes to keep the world from forgetting. 

Irene Butter headshot
Stateside Staff / Michigan Radio

 


 

Some 11 million people were killed during the Holocaust, and those who survived have lived so long, they're now watching the world forget. 

 

A recent poll shows 66 percent of American millennials don't know what Auschwitz is. Another 22 percent had not heard of the Holocaust or weren't sure if they had. 

 

Courtesy of Tunde Wey

It’s easy to picture “comfort food,” but what about “discomfort food?”

That’s what Tunde Wey will be serving up in the pop-restaurant Saartj, running from May 2 to May 5 inside the community space Bank Suey in Hamtramck.

Sunday can be an excellent time to stay home and potter about. But not everyone is a potterer. 

Some of us are putterers who'd rather spend our spare time puttering around the house. And some of us like to putter about but are open to pottering around.


Stateside 4.27.2018

Apr 27, 2018

Today on Stateside, we learn an anti-marijuana group is considering all options, including lawsuits, to keep pot illegal in Michigan. And, visit White Lake Township Library, where neighbors come together to fix each other's broken things.

Belt Publishing

There’s a new collection of stories from Michigan and other Midwest states called Voices from the Rust Belt. Twenty-four writers deal with diverse topics ranging from witnessing segregation, exploring childhood events that leave their mark on adulthood, and some quirks of history where we live.

Daniel Hensel / Michigan Radio

You've heard of cat cafes, board game cafes, and tech cafes. What about repair cafes?

Last week, the White Lake Township Library, about 35 miles northwest of Detroit, held its fourth repair cafe. Instead of throwing away a broken lamp or a shirt with a hole in it, people came to the library to get it fixed.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

We like to hang out with people who make things by hand and then report back to you about their work. We call the series: Artisans of Michigan.

We visited Scared Crow Steamworks in Flint. Heather Wright is the designer of steampunk jewelry.

Corner of a library with bookshelves and a study table
Blue Mountains Library / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

 


 

The National Endowment for the Arts came up with its Big Read program to draw communities together. 

 

The idea is to choose a book and get people reading, talking, and sharing ideas. 

JEFFREY SMITH / FLICKR - HTTP://BIT.LY/1XMSZCG

It’s time for another edition of Theater TalkDavid Kiley, editor-in-chief of Encore Michigan, joined Stateside to preview and review plays around Michigan.

Johnson's Sambo Princess prints hanging in the exhibit
Photo courtesy of Paul Johnson

 


 

Detroit artist Paul Johnson has produced a lot of work that explores the female form — a curvy, tiny-waisted, large-and-drooping-eyed figure. 

It's no trifle that we received two emails within two weeks about the word "trifle." The first one came from a listener named Matt who writes:

"Something insignificant is often described as 'a mere trifle.' At the same time, something that could be very challenging is said to be 'nothing to trifle with.' How did we end up with such different meanings for the same word?"

As English Professor Anne Curzan was researching Matt's question, a colleague who also wanted to know more about trifle sent her an email with the subject line "Because I'm triflin'." 

Coincidence or kismet? We're pretty sure it's the latter.


Stateside 4.20.2018

Apr 20, 2018

Is Michigan on the brink of an all-out stink bug invasion? That answer today on Stateside. We also hear why pundits say legalizing pot now won't keep Democrats from the polls.

cocktail and bottles of liquor
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Tammy Coxen of Tammy’s Tastings wanted to mix a drink to honor one of Michigan’s distillers.

“Our friends out at Long Road Distillers in Grand Rapids just won a big award. They were named ‘Best of Class’ for their 'Old Aquavit’ at the American Distillers Institute.”  (See award winners here.)

Stateside 4.19.2018

Apr 19, 2018

Today on Stateside, we hear the story of Henry Ford's push to grow soybeans in America, and we learn some environmentalists have a blind spot when it comes to being allies of native people.

Stateside 4.17.2018

Apr 17, 2018

Today on Stateside, we hear Desiree Linden explain how training in Michigan helped her conquer a wet, windy Boston Marathon. And, a Senegalese mother discusses her aim to empower African immigrant families in Detroit.

Jean Grae and Quell Chris.

Each month, we take a listen to new music from Detroit-area artists brought to us by Paul Young, founder and publisher of Detroit Music Magazine, and Khalid Bhatti, the magazine's executive editor. Our featured artists this month are: the duo Jean Grae and Quelle ChrisTunde Olaniran, and Mexican Knives.

Three female Mariachis
Anahli Jazhmin / Courtesy of Mariachi Femenil Detroit

If you close your eyes and picture a Mariachi band, you might see something like this -- sombreros, ornate black suits, stringed instruments -- all worn and played by mustachioed men.

A group called Mariachi Femenil Detroit is working hard to broaden that image and bring gender equality to the genre.

An eggcorn is a word or phrase that occurs when someone re-interprets a word in a way that makes sense and allows them to understand its components.

For example, someone might say "all intensive purposes," when what they really mean is "all intents and purposes." Or "escape goat" instead of "scape goat."

Anne Curzan has been thinking about an eggcorn she heard on the radio recently. During an interview, a person said "halfhazard" instead of "haphazard." 

It's an it's easy mistake to make. Does anyone actually know what a "hap" is?


A figure walking away down a street.
Screengrab of Hamoody Jaafar's film Detroit Diamond

Tomorrow, the Grand Rapids Film Festival will screen the short film Detroit Diamond. The film is about a young mother addicted to heroin. The state is working to take away her son.

Hamoody Jaafar, who directed the film, and Michael R. Flores, who wrote its screenplay, joined Stateside to discuss the script’s very personal inspiration, its all-female cast, and why Detroit Diamond is not just set in Detroit but was filmed in the city and uses nearly all Detroit actors.

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