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Stateside

Here you'll find the full program for Michigan Radio's Stateside. To find the individual segments and posts, go here.

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Today on Stateside, Democratic nominee Elissa Slotkin on why she's running in Michigan's 8th Congressional District, one of the most expensive races in the country. Plus, Washtenaw County Department of Veterans Affairs director Michael Smith talks about how a shortage of qualified staff makes it harder for Michigan veterans to determine their eligibility for federal VA benefits. 

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

train
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Today on Stateside, pollster Richard Czuba on how news consumers should be looking at media coverage of polls in 2018. Plus, Stateside kicks off a week-long series about the challenges Michigan veterans face connecting with VA benefits after returning to civilian life. Two veterans, one who served in Vietnam and one who served in Iraq, discuss their experiences navigating life after returning home from war. 

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

 

Emilio Gutierrez Soto was a journalist in Mexico reporting on the military’s behavior during a drug cartel crack down. He sought asylum in the U.S. in 2008. He joins us to discuss the seven months he spent in detention under the Trump administration. 

 

Lynette Clemetson is the Director of the Knight-Wallace Fellowships for Journalists at the University of Michigan, where Mr. Gutierrez has been awarded a fellowship for this year. 

 

PFAS foam washing up on the shore of Van Ettan Lake.
Michigan Department of Environmental Quality / Flickr http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

Over the past two years, Michiganders across the state have become aware of the chemicals known as PFAS. They first made news when elevated levels were found in more than 20 private water wells in Oscoda. Now, there are 35 known contamination sites around the state.

classroom of kids
NeONBRAND / Unsplash

Today on Stateside, a conversation about the dismal state of special education in Michigan in light of a recent report that names it as the only state in need of federal intervention to help improve special education curriculum. Plus, an environmental health expert talks about the potential health risks associated with PFAS exposure. 

Bird electric scooter
April Van Buren / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, why the auto industry is breathing "a sigh of relief" after President Trump announced the trilateral trade deal that will replace NAFTA. Plus, an Oscoda resident shares his experience of being affected by PFAS contamination, kicking off Michigan Radio's week-long series on contamination by the chemicals across the state.    

Razi Jafri

Today on Stateside, our political analysts weigh in on a study that suggests Michigan is unprepared for another recession. Then, we talk to a member of a grassroots, campus-based organization working to bridge the American political divide. Plus, the future of plant-based plastics.

Cheyna Roth

 


Today on Stateside, we hear from Michigan voters who express which issues are most important to them in the upcoming election season. Plus, two University of Michigan professors discuss their efforts to bring sustainable energy to Puerto Rico. 

United Soybean Board / Flickr

Today on Stateside, we hear from a Michigan soybean farmer on how President Trump's escalating trade war with China is projected to affect the state's agriculture producers. Plus, Stateside's education commentator Matinga Ragatz weighs in on the teacher shortage crisis facing Michigan schools. 

Mike Mozart / Flickr

Today on Stateside, a former Environmental Protection Agency advisor, along with hundreds of of other former EPA employees, are speaking out against the Trump administration's plan to weaken national fuel economy standards. Plus, Detroit Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Charlie LeDuff on his new book Sh*tshow: The Country's Collapsing... and the Ratings are Great. 

ford field
meesh / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

Today on Stateside, a Michigan official responds to the controversy surrounding Wisconsin’s quiet approval of a 2010 request to divert nearly 11 million gallons of Great Lakes water per day. Plus, a comic book that explores the repatriation of Native American remains and the relationship between indigenous tribes and museums.

album cover of space odyssey soundtrack
User Per-Olof Forsberg / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Today on Stateside, why a large diversion of Lake Michigan water approved by the state of Wisconsin in 2010 is drawing new scrutiny. Plus, ringing in the first weekend of fall with a Michigan version of a tropical cocktail.  

fracking well
Tim Evanson / Wikimedia Commons / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Today on Stateside, Democratic Congressman Dan Kildee discusses what he is doing to prevent the deportation of a 48-year-old man from Nigeria who is deaf and has cognitive disabilities. Plus, University of Michigan Professor Daniel Raimi breaks down the risks, myths, and benefits of fracking.

Debbie Stabenow being interviewed by Cynthia Canty
Matt Williams

Today on Stateside, U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow (D) on how a trade war with China is hurting Michigan businesses. Plus, Holocaust survivor Irene Butter explains why, after decades of silence, she started talking about her family’s experience during WW2.

 

Detroit Music Magazine founder and publisher Paul Young talks about the musical path set by long-time staples of Detroit’s electronic and art music scene.

 

Holocaust survivor Irene Butter talks about her family’s life before and after World War 2, as detailed in her recent memoir Shores Beyond Shores: From Holocaust to Hope, My True Story.

Motor Corps and Canteen volunteers from the Detroit chapter of the American Red Cross, taking a break from delivering supplies to influenza victims.
NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION

Today on Stateside, Libertarian gubernatorial candidate Bill Gelineau says he would cut Medicaid costs by rewarding young women for not getting pregnant before age 23. Plus, 100 years ago, the world’s deadliest flu pandemic hit Michigan and killed roughly 19,000 people.

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

Shelter leader responds to complaints from homeless Kalamazoo residents in ongoing protests

hospital exterior
Michigan Medicine

Nurses at the University of Michigan hospital have voted to authorize their union to call a three-day work stoppage if the university does not respond to claims of unfair labor practices. Ninety-four percent of the votes were in favor of the authorization.

child coloring with crayons
Unsplash / Aaron Burden

Today on Stateside, we hear from Kalamazoo’s city manager about the response to protests over homelessness in the city. Plus, parents aren’t the only ones with long lists of school supplies to buy before the year starts—teachers are spending their own money on classroom essentials, too.

City manager addresses protests over homelessness in Kalamazoo

 Reimund Holzhey mugshot
Courtesy of Michigan History Center

Today on Stateside, after a contentious city council meeting, Kalamazoo is moving to meet the demands of homeless protestors camped out in a downtown park. Plus, nationally-recognized teacher Matinga Ragatz talks about why she thinks school reform is hurting, not helping, students.

northern lights above the mackinac bridge
Wall Boat / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Today on Stateside, an explosive lawsuit against Michigan State University alleges that Larry Nassar raped an MSU athlete in 1992, and university officials covered it up. Plus, the best plays and musicals from Michigan’s local theater scene this month.

a collection of glowing rocks known as "yooperlites"
Erik Rintamaki

Today on Stateside, why President Trump's tweets are unlikely to change Ford's decision to move small car production abroad. Plus, why rocks in the U.P. are giving off an alien glow. (No, it does not involve extraterrestrials.)

Listen above for the full show, or find individual segments below. 

Ford won’t be moving production of Focus hatchback to the U.S. Here’s why.

children lined up on a sidewalk
Airman 1st Class Lausanne Morgan / U.S. Air Force

Today on Stateside, Governor Rick Snyder announced he's striking a question about past felony convictions from some state job and license applications. And, what should schools do with millions of dollars in school safety grants from the state? 

Erick Senkmajer (L) and Erika Senecal (R).
Joe Linstroth / Michigan Radio

On today's Stateside, the Republican-controlled state Legislature passes two progressive ballot proposals, giving them the power to amend the laws with a simple majority. Plus, two Port Huron teachers reflect on teaching high school music when you're just starting out, and when you've been doing it for 27 years.  

Orange construction barrels
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

On today's Stateside, you've probably seen pictures of plastic pollution in the ocean forming giant islands or entrapping sea animals. But what happens when plastic gets into the Great Lakes? Plus, a Michigan chaplain pushing for prison reform in the 1930s wanted to enrich inmates lives with art. 

Sleeping Bear Dunes, a popular tourist spot in Northern Michigan
Flickr user Rodney Campbell / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

On today's Stateside, the students in Detroit's public schools are starting the year drinking bottled water after high levels of copper and lead were found in some drinking fountains. Plus, trips to Michigan's sand dunes are a classic summer activity, but could climate change reshape the state's beloved natural landmarks? 

Today on Stateside, why Republicans might be eyeing an adoption of paid sick leave and mininum wage proposals before they make it to the ballot. Plus, how your neighborhood can help, or hurt, your health. 

Stateside 8.30.2018

Aug 30, 2018

On Stateside today, Michigan tribal members and other activists plan to paddle the Mackinac Straits to protest Enbridge's Line 5 pipeline. Plus, why the language we use when talking about cancer matters. 

To hear individual conversations, click here or see below: 

Stateside 8.29.2018

Aug 29, 2018

Today on Stateside, test results show fewer than half of Michigan's students are proficient in reading. So why isn't the state making gains in literacy? Plus, a Michigan teenager's baking skills have earned her a spot on national television.

Stateside 8.28.2018

Aug 28, 2018

Today on Stateside, the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality says elevated PFAS levels in the Flint River posed no threat to the city's public water supply during the water crisis. Plus, as thousands of mourners gather in Detroit to say goodbye to Aretha Franklin, how should the city memorialize the Queen of Soul?  

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