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storytelling

Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

Many cultures use storytelling as a way to pass down their history and heritage.

Native American cultures are known for their rich oral traditions. So here's one to consider. 

Have you heard of the term counting coup?

Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

Stateside returns with another campfire story told by Jenifer Strauss, a professional storyteller based in Traverse City.

Jen spent her summers attending Tamarack Camps, a Jewish summer camp run by the Fresh Air Society in Bloomfield Hills. It was during these adolescent years when she first heard the urban legend, “Bloody Mary.”

Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

Each year, Native American kids can enjoy a cultural summer camp experience at the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi's Rodgers Lake campus. Many of the camp activities are built around cultural teachings, and a big part of that is telling stories passed down through generations. 

Colin Wesaw is a tribal elder and leader in the Pokagon Band community. He often tells stories at Camp Kë Gbéshmen in Dowagiac. The 63-year-old started telling stories when he was just 18. 

He joined Stateside to talk about the importance of stories, and to share a tale about making choices. 

Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

There's something about the a crackling campfire and the looming mystery of a nighttime forest that creates the perfect atmosphere for telling a special kind of story.

Some campfire stories aim to send a shiver down your spine. Others seek to remember a past moment in history or teach a good life lesson.

With that tradition in mind, Stateside will be bringing you a series of stories this summer perfect for your next bonfire. 

Group sitting on rug
Riverwise Website

Detroit-based quarterly magazine, Riverwise, focuses on activism and neighborhood concerns in Detroit and is now looking to find and train writers.

Managing editor Eric Campbell joined Stateside to talk about the magazine and the vision that brought it to life. 

Corner of a library with bookshelves and a study table
Blue Mountains Library / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

 


 

The National Endowment for the Arts came up with its Big Read program to draw communities together. 

 

The idea is to choose a book and get people reading, talking, and sharing ideas. 

two people standing at a microphone
Courtesy of Relato:Detroit / Facebook

The Metro Detroit area is incredibly culturally diverse. The region is home to more than 30 languages, and in more than 600-thousand homes, a language other than English is spoken at the dinner table.

The group Relato:Detroit wants to bring those immigrant or bilingual speakers into the storytelling fold.

Courtesy Photo / Zak Rosen

Among the big life questions we all face, this is one of the biggest: whether or not to have a baby. 

Detroit-based writer and radio producer Zak Rosen is good at telling stories. Now he and wife Shira Rosen are telling their own personal story in a new podcast called Pregnant Pause.

At PechaKucha 20x20, speakers have to tell the audience "Why Flint?" using 20 images and 400 seconds.
Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

You've heard of poetry slams, TED talks and the Moth. Now, we'll introduce you to PechaKucha 20x20, happening Thursday at Tenacity Brewing in Flint.

David Stanley, one of the organizers of the event, joined Stateside to explain what this presentation style is all about.  

Michigan Radio and AEG Live will present a live performance of the popular public radio show Snap Judgment in Royal Oak on Friday, December 9, at 7:00 p.m.

Courtesy of The Moth

Some fine storytelling is coming to the Wharton Center at Michigan State University.

The Moth Mainstage happens tomorrow night, June 9, at 7:30.

Jay Allison, producer of The Moth Radio Hour, joined us today to talk about the event, the Moth's history and the often overlooked importance of storytelling.

GUEST

Jay Allison is producer of The Moth Radio Hour. He tweets @jay_allison.