Getting Through | Michigan Radio
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Getting Through

Credit Paulette Parker / Michigan Radio

It’s been more than a year since our lives were upended by COVID-19, and Michigan Radio has tirelessly chronicled the news along the way. Not just about the pandemic, but about historic flooding that displaced residents; street protests demanding racial justice; a plot to kidnap Michigan’s governor; and more.

It’s all felt like a little too much, right?

We get it.

That’s why we’re launching Getting Through: a project that steps away from the news, and brings you stories and sounds that are, well, getting us through. Connecting us to what’s important. Grounding us.

Share your story about who or what is getting you through by calling (734) 408-1753 and leaving us a message. Or become a Michigan Radio reporter and record the sounds of what's getting you through and emailing us at gettingthrough@michiganradio.org. Your submission may be used on-air or online. You can find out more here

Ways to Connect

cover of the book The Elephant of Belfast
Counterpoint Press

Today, on Stateside, Windsor health officials warn essential workers crossing the border to Detroit daily to limit their time in the city during Michigan's COVID spike. Plus, writer S. Kirk Walsh talks about her debut novel The Elephant of Belfast, inspired by true events that took place during World War II.

Courtesy Photo

Need some restorative listening? Look no further. This is Getting Through, a new series where we cover the stories and sounds of how we’re staying grounded during this really challenging moment.

In this installment, we cook a meal with shane bernardo (who uses they and him pronouns and prefers their name lower-case). For bernardo, cooking cultural foods has been a practice to stay grounded during the past few months. bernardo is Filipino, a life-long Detroiter, and uses food as a medium for healing.

Courtesy of Katie O'Donnell

Katie O’Donnell asked her students to take out a worksheet for a writing exercise that she had included in a packet of supplies. She teaches kindergarten at Detroit Achievement Academy, a charter school on the city’s west side that has been operating on a hybrid model since the fall.

One of her students, a boy she said shifts between his parents’ houses, didn’t have the packet with him, so O’Donnell asked him if there was anything else he could use to write on. She and her students watched online as he and his mother scrounged around their home for supplies. “All they could come up with was this tiny ripped-off sheet of paper, and they didn't have any pencils or anything.” O’Donnell recalled, and added that similar situations have played out several times over the last year.

It’s been more than a year since our lives were upended by COVID-19, and Michigan Radio has tirelessly chronicled the news along the way. Not just about the pandemic, but about historic flooding that displaced residents; street protests demanding racial justice; a plot to kidnap Michigan’s governor; and more. 

It’s all felt like a little too much, right? 

We get it.

Courtesy Photo

It’s been over a year since COVID-19 hit Michigan and there’s been so much news to keep up with. From burned-out health care workers and grieving families, to street protests against police brutality, to violence in our state and national capitals. It's been a lot.

So we want to switch gears a little with a new series called Getting Through. These are stories and sounds of how we’re staying grounded during this chaos.