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Stateside

Monday through Friday @ 3:00 p.m. & 10 p.m.

Conversations about what matters in Michigan.

Stateside covers a wide range of Michigan news and policy issues — as well as culture and lifestyle stories. In keeping with Michigan Radio’s broad coverage across southern Michigan, Stateside focuses on topics and events that matter to people all across the state. Stateside is hosted by Cynthia Canty (Mon-Thu) and Lester Graham (Fri). 

To find audio for the full show you can subscribe to our podcast or the full show here  

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Music teachers Erick Senkmajer and Erika Senecal
Joe Linstroth / Michigan Radio

Taking that first step down a career path can be daunting, like stepping into a world completely unknown.

On the flip side, if you've been walking that path a while, odds are you've learned a thing or two.

Union lockout halts major Michigan road projects

Sep 5, 2018
Raymond. D. Woods, Jr. / FLICKR CREATIVE COMMONS HTTP://MICHRAD.IO/1LXRDJM

Some important road projects across the state - including I-696 and I-75 - are on hold because of a lockout of unionized heavy equipment operators and technicians, represented by Operating Engineers Local 324.

Orange construction barrels
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

On today's Stateside, you've probably seen pictures of plastic pollution in the ocean forming giant islands or entrapping sea animals. But what happens when plastic gets into the Great Lakes? Plus, a Michigan chaplain pushing for prison reform in the 1930s wanted to enrich inmates lives with art. 

Gretchen Whitmer
Whitmer for Governor

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Gretchen Whitmer says literacy for Michigan's schoolchildren is a top priority.

Sleeping Bear Dunes, a popular tourist spot in Northern Michigan
Flickr user Rodney Campbell / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

On today's Stateside, the students in Detroit's public schools are starting the year drinking bottled water after high levels of copper and lead were found in some drinking fountains. Plus, trips to Michigan's sand dunes are a classic summer activity, but could climate change reshape the state's beloved natural landmarks? 

michigan state university sign
Branislav Ondrasik / Wikimedia Commons / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

A recent editorial in Inside Higher Ed called on academia to “confront the power dynamics that can make academia a haven for predatory behavior and abuse.”

It was jointly signed by eight deans at Michigan State University, a school rocked by the conviction of Larry Nassar. The former sports doctor and MSU employee abused hundreds of girls and women under the guise of treatment.

neighborhood
Brandon Jacoby / Unsplash

Past research has indicated that where you live can affect your health. But what factors go into that, and how do you know just how bad or good your neighborhood is for you health?

AcrylicArtist / MorgueFile

 


The Michigan Legislature will return from summer break next week, and Republicans are discussing the potential of adopting two proposals headed to the ballot this November. 

A meteoroid flew over I-75 Northbound in metro Detroit Tuesday night.
Mike Austin / YouTube

 


In January, there were sightings of a fireball in the sky over Southeast Michigan.

The following day, the United States Geological Survey confirmed it was a meteoroid which had exploded in the atmosphere.

At the time, the loud "boom" it caused was reported to register at 2.0 on the Richter scale, but for the USGS and NASA, it didn't seem like that big of a deal.

Multi-colored books.
Kimberly Farmer / Unsplash

Between now and November's election, we’re having conversations with statewide candidates about a variety of issues. The first one we’re tackling with candidates is education.

Recently-released state test results show that literacy scores of Michigan schoolchildren have continued to decline. Only 44 % of kids from 3rd grade through 8th grade in the state reached proficiency in the literacy portion of the test. That means more than half failed.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

This shop is Fidler Furniture Company… headed up by Steven Mark Fidler.

“We do primarily custom metalwork. We do some woodwork where we have exotic woods we mix with our metalwork. Sometimes people want a table and they want a wood top, but a metal base and we can do both of those,” Fidler explained. 

Two men in uniforms stand on a boat and a dock.
Kaye LaFond / Michigan Radio

 

Frustrated by what they say is inadequate information provided to them by Enbridge, the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians sent their own tribal research vessel to the Straits of Mackinac on Thursday to take sonar imagery of the company’s Line 5 pipelines.

 

table of laptops
Marvin Meyer / Unsplash

 


In most workplaces, people are expected to do what their boss asks of them. But some worker's cooperatives are challenging the traditional office hierarchy.

The Sassafras Tech Collective, based in Ann Arbor, is the only registered tech co-op in the state. 

Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

 


All this summer, we've brought you campfire stories from across the state.

Now, with summer winding down, we reluctantly say goodbye to our summer series with one final tale.

Colin Wesaw was recently elected Elder’s Representative for the Pokagon Band’s tribal council. He joined Stateside’s Cynthia Canty to share "The Girl and the Frogs."

old school Ford logo
James & Carol Lee / Unsplash

Ford Motor Company got some troubling news this week from Moody's Investors Service.

It has downgraded Ford's investment rating to just one level above junk status. To Moody's, this signifies the chance of default.

protesters against Line 5 on the water
Courtesy of Andrea Pierce

This Saturday, a flotilla of kayaks, paddleboards, and birch bark canoes will paddle out into the Straits of Mackinac between Lake Michigan and Lake Huron.

It's the fourth annual Pipe Out Paddle Protest against the pair of oil and liquid natural gas pipelines known as Line 5 that lie beneath the Straits. 

doctor holding a stethoscope
Alex Proimos / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

In the past few weeks, there have been two high-profile people who lost their lives to cancer. Aretha Franklin died from pancreatic cancer. John McCain died from a brain cancer called glioblastoma.

Detroit skyline
Justin McAfee / Unsplash

How is design playing a role in Detroit’s revitalization?

That question will be on many designers’ minds at the first-ever Detroit Month of Design. It runs the entire month of September with events all around the city.

A long table surrounded by red chairs in a school classroom.
BES Photos / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 


The Michigan Department of Education on Wednesday released the results of its latest M-STEP assessment exams.

The big takeaways? Only 44-percent of students in grades 3-8 passed the literacy part of the exam. That's down from 2015, the first year the M-STEP was given.

Kamryn Chasnis holding piece of bread
Courtesy of Kamryn Chasnis

 


Thirteen-year-old Kamryn Chasnis of Saginaw Township has been baking and cooking her whole life.

When she began watching cooking shows, there were only adult competitors. But then stations began to launch children's competitions, and Chasnis wanted to compete. 

Bob Jagendorf / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

President Trump's announcement of a limited bilateral trade agreement with Mexico to replace NAFTA is being closely watched by the farming community.

The deal is a not a finished product, and it still needs to clear Congress.

Barbara Barton and Roger LaBine
Barbara Barton

 


There is a rich tradition of wild rice in our state, especially for Michigan's first people. The plant plays a big role in the culture of Anishinaabe tribes, who call it manoomin. 

scan of The Michigan Essay newspaper
Archives of Michigan

For much of American history, newspapers were the main source of information for citizens of all backgrounds.

And although profits may have been a top priority, newspapers helped form and inform communities, and provided a check on government.

the flint river
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

 


Yesterday, MLive's Ron Fonger published a story detailing what the state knew about PFAS levels in the Flint River before the city switched its water source. 

a chair on a stage
Hernán Piñera / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

It’s time for another edition of Theater Talk with David Kiley, editor-in-chief of Encore Michigan

Kiley joined Stateside to talk about the winners of the Wilde Awards, which honors the best plays, musicals, directors, playwrites, and actors in Michigan.  

Harold Becker (left) and Sean Tracy (right) in the Stateside studio.
Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

When it comes to thanking the nation's veterans, some would say we can never do it enough.

Sean Tracy has taken that gratitude to a whole new level.

He travels throughout the Midwest recording veterans’ oral histories and crafting tribute walls at Independence Village and StoryPoint, senior living communities where he serves as the Veteran Project coordinator.

Michigan auto show
Michigan International Auto Show

 

President Trump says he has reached a trade deal with Mexico to replace NAFTA, even though the agreement announced on Monday does not include Canada.

Lines out the Charles Wright Museum
Imani Mixon / Michigan Radio

 

Outside the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History today, hundreds of people lined up to bid their final farewell to Aretha Franklin.

The public visitation is part of a week of mourning and will take place Tuesday and Wednesday at the Wright Museum, with thousands expected to be in attendance. 

 

The Flint River.
Sarah Razak / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

In the spring of 2014, Flint's water source was switched to the Flint River.

We know what happened when that untreated water leached lead from aging pipes, but in his story today for MLive, Flint journalist Ron Fonger revealed that before the water switch even happened, the state tested the Flint River and discovered rising levels of PFAS contamination. 

An architectural rendering of the Detroit Zoo biodigester.
Detroit Zoological Society

If zoos have a lot of one thing, it's manure.

That's why the Detroit Zoo turned to Michigan State University researcher Dana Kirk to help turn that manure into power.

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