Stateside | Michigan Radio
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Stateside

Monday through Friday @ 3:00 p.m. & 10 p.m.

Conversations about what matters in Michigan.

Stateside covers a wide range of Michigan news and policy issues — as well as culture and lifestyle stories. In keeping with Michigan Radio’s broad coverage across southern Michigan, Stateside focuses on topics and events that matter to people all across the state. Stateside is hosted by Cynthia Canty (Mon-Thu) and Lester Graham (Fri). 

To find audio for the full show you can subscribe to our podcast or the full show here  

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Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

Stateside returns with another campfire story told by Jenifer Strauss, a professional storyteller based in Traverse City.

Jen spent her summers attending Tamarack Camps, a Jewish summer camp run by the Fresh Air Society in Bloomfield Hills. It was during these adolescent years when she first heard the urban legend, “Bloody Mary.”

Pirates on a ship at the Michigan Pirate Festival
Dagny Mol / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

If you find yourself in Grand Haven this week, be prepared!

The 12th annual Michigan Pirate Festival is happening Tuesday through Saturday, so Grand Haven will be invaded by fun-loving pirates. 

Courtesy of Camp Kid Power

Some 20 percent of preschool-age kids in this country have some type of anxiety disorder. That's according to a 2014 paper published in the Journal of Clinical Adolescent Psychology.

Youngsters with anxiety can find it challenging to enjoy activities like summer camp.

And that's where Camp Kid Power comes in.

chair lift at bottom of stairs
Wikimedia / http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

The larger Metro Detroit area, including the inner-ring suburbs, the outer-ring suburbs, and the surrounding counties, is beginning to face a new problem that's only going to get bigger.

We have an aging population, and our housing stock is largely inadequate for those older residents, especially when it comes to negotiating physical barriers like steps.

political yard signs
Scorpians and Centaurs / Flickr

Next Tuesday is primary election day in Michigan. That means come Wednesday, it’s time for general election campaigns.

But, how does a candidate actually win? What strategy will get them from primary winner to governor or attorney general or county drain commissioner?

jackson mine in negaunee
Andrew Jameson / Wikimedia Commons http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

This weekend, the town of Negaunee in Michigan's Upper Peninsula will be filled with the sound of wheezing bellows and ringing hammers hitting anvils.

The Michigan Iron Industry Museum is holding its Artisans at the Forge festival, which includes blacksmiths and other craftspeople.

quilt from project
Courtesy of Migrant Quilt Project

An Arizona quiltmaker is exploring one of the most contentious issues in the U.S. today: immigration.

Her traveling exhibition, “Beyond the Border Wall: The Migrant Quilt Project,” will open next week in Grand Haven’s Loutit District Library. 

JODI WESTRICK / Michigan Radio

Lawyers of Larry Nassar are asking for a resentencing hearing for their client, and a new judge to preside over it.

Nassar is the former Michigan State University doctor who, for decades, sexually abused the girls and young women he was supposed to be treating.

people shaking hands at a table
Pixabay

In an era when we can work remotely, or spend our workdays buried in a cubicle, it's easy to feel isolated and alone.

One cure for that isolation is mentoring — whether that means finding a mentor or being one. 

Robert Pasick, career coach and lecturer at the UM Ross School of Business, joined Stateside to talk about the value of mentorship both in and outside of the office. 

Cheers! We've got a honey of a Michigan cocktail for you.

The website for Bløm Meadworks suggests, “…if the word ‘mead’ automatically conjures a drinking hall filled with Vikings for you, think of ours as its friendly, approachable descendants, without the pillage and plunder.”

Cute.

But we’re taking the Vikings to Mexico.

work in progress farmers
Joey Horan / Michigan Radio

“Work in Progress” is a new Stateside series about what it's like to be at opposite ends of the same career path. You'll hear conversations between two people —one who's just starting out in a job and one who's been working in the field for a long time.

Throughout the series we’ll feature conversations between people who have chosen a variety of career paths ranging from conductors, to priests, nurses, and millwrights.

But first, we turn the spotlight on two farmers.

Person in gray hoodie with one hand cuffed and the other cuff hanging open in front of a cloudy sky
Pexels / Pixabay

Think of someone with cancer, or hypertension, or diabetes.

Imagine hauling a person with cancer or diabetes before a judge, and charging him with a crime for having that disease? Obviously not, but that's what's happening to people in the grips of the disease of addiction. 

A program called Hope Not Handcuffs is trying to change that paradigm by working with police agencies and the courts. 

MGoBlog / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0 (for photos on Flickr)

Ohio State University has put head football coach Urban Meyer on paid leave while the school investigates whether he protected former assistant coach Zach Smith, who was fired last week.

a Ford Mustang Bullitt
Courtesy of Ford Motor Company

The Trump administration today made it official: it wants to freeze an Obama-era program called the Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards — or CAFE. The program was intended to improve fuel efficiency and cut pollution. 

The White House's proposal would lower fuel efficiency targets, and get rid of California's special exemption under the Clean Air Act, which lets the state set its own limits on air pollution.

Traverse City Film Festival theater and banner
Michigan Municipal League / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

The motto of the Traverse City Film Festival gets right to the point: "One Great Movie Can Change You." 

The 14th annual festival is underway now and runs through Sunday, August 5. 

Meg Weichman, creative director of the Traverse City Film Festival, joined Stateside to tell us a little bit about the most exciting films in this year's lineup. 

Granite Island
Anne / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

NASA researchers have cast their eyes on a little island in Lake Superior that sits about 12 miles northwest of Marquette.

Granite Island has been chosen as a site for NASA research that could help scientists better understand the way clouds and aerosol particles in the atmosphere affect global climate change.

NASA is working with Northern Michigan University on the project.

woman signing petition
Courtesy of Voters Not Politicians

The legal challenges are over for an anti-gerrymandering ballot proposal. In a 4 to 3 vote, the Michigan Supreme Court ruled that the question is cleared to appear on November’s ballot.

Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

Each year, Native American kids can enjoy a cultural summer camp experience at the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi's Rodgers Lake campus. Many of the camp activities are built around cultural teachings, and a big part of that is telling stories passed down through generations. 

Colin Wesaw is a tribal elder and leader in the Pokagon Band community. He often tells stories at Camp Kë Gbéshmen in Dowagiac. The 63-year-old started telling stories when he was just 18. 

He joined Stateside to talk about the importance of stories, and to share a tale about making choices. 

Harriet Quimby in a plane
Library of Congress

A century ago, a Michigan woman soared above the patriarchy, flouting the restrictions placed on women in her era.

It was on this day in 1911, that Arcadia Township's Harriet Quimby became the first female pilot licensed in the nation, blazing the way for famous aviator Amelia Earhart.

Michigan History Center's Rachel Clark and the Henry Ford Museum of American Innovation's Curator of Transportation Matt Anderson spoke with Stateside about the trail-blazing aviator.

Irredeemable: Coming clean

Aug 1, 2018
Tholen family
Courtesy of the Tholen family

(Editor's note: We recommend you listen to the story before reading.)

It was December when Rick Tholen was killed. He was working at M&J Grocery in Grand Rapids.

He’d just graduated college and was in his first year of teaching high school English. And he’d decided to take some shifts over Christmas break for extra cash. He was getting married soon.

It was around 10 p.m. The store was empty except for Rick. That’s when Chester Patterson and his co-defendant arrived; Chester had a gun.

“It was a .22 caliber,” says Chester.

bail bonds
Thomas Hawk / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

One of the core philosophies of U.S. criminal law is the presumption of innocence, that defendants charged with crimes are innocent until proven guilty.

renaissance center
Mike Boening Photography / flickr - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

This week, 3,000 journalists from around the world come to Detroit for the annual convention of the National Association of Black Journalists. The NABJ hasn't held its convention in the Motor City since 1992.

Student using 3-D Printer
Rylie Kostreva / Michigan Tech

It's been a tense few months between the United States and many of its big trading partners. President Donald Trump's tariffs have targeted China, Canada, the European Union, and Mexico.

Those have, in many cases, triggered retaliatory tariffs, and American consumers are hearing: "we are going to wind up paying."

The Poweshiek skipperling at rest.
Cale Nordmeyer

One of the 27 Michigan species facing extinction is a tiny butterfly called the Poweshiek skipperling. They are small, about an inch long, and live in native prairie habitats throughout the Midwest.

They were once a common sight in Michigan, but Oakland County is one of the very few remaining places where you can find a Poweshiek skipperling. 

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist Tamara Smith studies the butterfly and joined Stateside to talk about what’s driving the steep decline in population.

michigan monkey flower
Michigan State University Extension

A recent proposal by the Trump administration could mean big changes for the Endangered Species Act.

That law was passed some 40 years ago. It was designed to keep endangered plant and animal species from going extinct.

Marquan Kane
Gabrielle Horton / Michigan Radio

Marquan Kane knows poverty. He’s seen what gun violence and drugs have done to people he loves.

His response? To work for social reform and challenge other young people to join him in a new civil rights movement.

Kane has been named Washtenaw County’s 2018 Young Citizen of the Year to recognize his work in criminal justice reform. Governor Snyder appointed him to Michigan’s Committee on Juvenile Justice. On top of that, he also recently graduated from Ann Arbor Pioneer High School.

Gary Shear / Unsplash

Michigan Radio’s sports commentator John U. Bacon is back to the grind after enjoying a much-needed summer vacation.

Bacon joined Stateside to talk about the long-awaited induction of Detroit Tiger greats Alan Trammell and Jack Morris into the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York, and much more. 

School desks
Flickr user Frank Juarez/Flickr / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Michigan is not doing a good job educating children with disabilities. That’s according to a recent letter from the U.S. Department of Education.

Michigan was the only state rated as needing federal intervention after failing to meet special education standards.

A few weeks before that letter became public, Detroit Public Schools Community District announced it would be doing a massive overhaul of its special education program.

pads and tampons
Michigan Radio

People everywhere need access to pads, tampons, and other feminine hygiene products, but throughout Michigan, some women and people in the transgender community are forced to go without. It’s a global phenomenon known as “period poverty.”

Christine Mwangi is founder of Be a Rose, an organization working to fight period poverty in the Grand Rapids area. She joined Stateside to talk about her organization is expanding access to resources and information related to women’s health. 

chase and steve moskalik in front of cases of bottled water at Parchment high school
Catherine Shaffer / Michigan Radio

Late last week, Michigan declared a state of emergency in Kalamazoo County. The state told 3,100 residents of Parchment and nearby Cooper Township to stop drinking and cooking with municipal water.

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